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Electronic speargun-like device for driving off sharks (13)

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Ferrari Press Agency Ref 10092 Shark 1 06/02/2019 See Ferrari text Picture must credit: Ocean Guardian Surfers, swimmers and scuba divers in high shark attack risk waters can make themselves safer with an electronic speargun-like gadget called the eSpear.Once fired in the water at one of the threatening fish, it send s out a three-dimensional electrical field When sharks enter this field, their electro-receptive system is disrupted, causing them to experience muscle spasms and severe discomfort.Although they're not actually harmed, they are motivated to immediately leave the area.It has been developed in Australia based on a previous anti-shark device called Shark Shield.The Shark Shield is worn on the thigh or ankle, or it can be mounted on a surfboard.Sydney-based Ocean Guardian's eSpear utilizes that same system, but it takes the form a "gun" that can be carried in an optional thigh holster, then pulled out when needed. If users think that a shark is getting a little too close, they squeeze the trigger. Doing so causes a forward section of the device to slide/pivot out from the main body, exposing two electrodes to the water. This, in turn, instantly creates an electrical field surrounding the device, measuring 1 meter across by 2.5 m in length (3.3 by 8.2 ft). OPS: The Ocean Guardian eSpear diagram of how it works. Elliptical shaped electrical field radiating in sterngth up to one metre across and two and a half metres in length. The shark has an electrical perception of 50 cms in front of its snout.This picks up the electrical waves and drives it away Picture supplied by Ferrari

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Ferrari Press Agency Ref 10092 Shark 1 06/02/2019 See Ferrari text Picture must credit: Ocean Guardian Surfers, swimmers and scuba divers in high shark attack risk waters can make themselves safer with an electronic speargun-like gadget called the eSpear.Once fired in the water at one of the threatening fish, it send s out a three-dimensional electrical field When sharks enter this field, their electro-receptive system is disrupted, causing them to experience muscle spasms and severe discomfort.Although they're not actually harmed, they are motivated to immediately leave the area.It has been developed in Australia based on a previous anti-shark device called Shark Shield.The Shark Shield is worn on the thigh or ankle, or it can be mounted on a surfboard.Sydney-based Ocean Guardian's eSpear utilizes that same system, but it takes the form a "gun" that can be carried in an optional thigh holster, then pulled out when needed. If users think that a shark is getting a little too close, they squeeze the trigger. Doing so causes a forward section of the device to slide/pivot out from the main body, exposing two electrodes to the water. This, in turn, instantly creates an electrical field surrounding the device, measuring 1 meter across by 2.5 m in length (3.3 by 8.2 ft). OPS: The Ocean Guardian eSpear being carried when snorkelling Picture supplied by Ferrari

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Ferrari Press Agency Ref 10092 Shark 1 06/02/2019 See Ferrari text Picture must credit: Ocean Guardian Surfers, swimmers and scuba divers in high shark attack risk waters can make themselves safer with an electronic speargun-like gadget called the eSpear.Once fired in the water at one of the threatening fish, it send s out a three-dimensional electrical field When sharks enter this field, their electro-receptive system is disrupted, causing them to experience muscle spasms and severe discomfort.Although they're not actually harmed, they are motivated to immediately leave the area.It has been developed in Australia based on a previous anti-shark device called Shark Shield.The Shark Shield is worn on the thigh or ankle, or it can be mounted on a surfboard.Sydney-based Ocean Guardian's eSpear utilizes that same system, but it takes the form a "gun" that can be carried in an optional thigh holster, then pulled out when needed. If users think that a shark is getting a little too close, they squeeze the trigger. Doing so causes a forward section of the device to slide/pivot out from the main body, exposing two electrodes to the water. This, in turn, instantly creates an electrical field surrounding the device, measuring 1 meter across by 2.5 m in length (3.3 by 8.2 ft). OPS: The Ocean Guardian eSpear being carried by a swimmer exploring a reef Picture supplied by Ferrari

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Ferrari Press Agency Ref 10092 Shark 1 06/02/2019 See Ferrari text Picture must credit: Ocean Guardian Surfers, swimmers and scuba divers in high shark attack risk waters can make themselves safer with an electronic speargun-like gadget called the eSpear.Once fired in the water at one of the threatening fish, it send s out a three-dimensional electrical field When sharks enter this field, their electro-receptive system is disrupted, causing them to experience muscle spasms and severe discomfort.Although they're not actually harmed, they are motivated to immediately leave the area.It has been developed in Australia based on a previous anti-shark device called Shark Shield.The Shark Shield is worn on the thigh or ankle, or it can be mounted on a surfboard.Sydney-based Ocean Guardian's eSpear utilizes that same system, but it takes the form a "gun" that can be carried in an optional thigh holster, then pulled out when needed. If users think that a shark is getting a little too close, they squeeze the trigger. Doing so causes a forward section of the device to slide/pivot out from the main body, exposing two electrodes to the water. This, in turn, instantly creates an electrical field surrounding the device, measuring 1 meter across by 2.5 m in length (3.3 by 8.2 ft). OPS: The Ocean Guardian eSpear being carried by a swimmer Picture supplied by Ferrari

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Ferrari Press Agency Ref 10092 Shark 1 06/02/2019 See Ferrari text Picture must credit: Ocean Guardian Surfers, swimmers and scuba divers in high shark attack risk waters can make themselves safer with an electronic speargun-like gadget called the eSpear.Once fired in the water at one of the threatening fish, it send s out a three-dimensional electrical field When sharks enter this field, their electro-receptive system is disrupted, causing them to experience muscle spasms and severe discomfort.Although they're not actually harmed, they are motivated to immediately leave the area.It has been developed in Australia based on a previous anti-shark device called Shark Shield.The Shark Shield is worn on the thigh or ankle, or it can be mounted on a surfboard.Sydney-based Ocean Guardian's eSpear utilizes that same system, but it takes the form a "gun" that can be carried in an optional thigh holster, then pulled out when needed. If users think that a shark is getting a little too close, they squeeze the trigger. Doing so causes a forward section of the device to slide/pivot out from the main body, exposing two electrodes to the water. This, in turn, instantly creates an electrical field surrounding the device, measuring 1 meter across by 2.5 m in length (3.3 by 8.2 ft). OPS: The Ocean Guardian eSpear. Snorkelling armed with an eSpear Picture supplied by Ferrari

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Ferrari Press Agency Ref 10092 Shark 1 06/02/2019 See Ferrari text Picture must credit: Ocean Guardian Surfers, swimmers and scuba divers in high shark attack risk waters can make themselves safer with an electronic speargun-like gadget called the eSpear.Once fired in the water at one of the threatening fish, it send s out a three-dimensional electrical field When sharks enter this field, their electro-receptive system is disrupted, causing them to experience muscle spasms and severe discomfort.Although they're not actually harmed, they are motivated to immediately leave the area.It has been developed in Australia based on a previous anti-shark device called Shark Shield.The Shark Shield is worn on the thigh or ankle, or it can be mounted on a surfboard.Sydney-based Ocean Guardian's eSpear utilizes that same system, but it takes the form a "gun" that can be carried in an optional thigh holster, then pulled out when needed. If users think that a shark is getting a little too close, they squeeze the trigger. Doing so causes a forward section of the device to slide/pivot out from the main body, exposing two electrodes to the water. This, in turn, instantly creates an electrical field surrounding the device, measuring 1 meter across by 2.5 m in length (3.3 by 8.2 ft). OPS: The Ocean Guardian eSpear fully extended in its charger Picture supplied by Ferrari

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Ferrari Press Agency Ref 10092 Shark 1 06/02/2019 See Ferrari text Picture must credit: Ocean Guardian Surfers, swimmers and scuba divers in high shark attack risk waters can make themselves safer with an electronic speargun-like gadget called the eSpear.Once fired in the water at one of the threatening fish, it send s out a three-dimensional electrical field When sharks enter this field, their electro-receptive system is disrupted, causing them to experience muscle spasms and severe discomfort.Although they're not actually harmed, they are motivated to immediately leave the area.It has been developed in Australia based on a previous anti-shark device called Shark Shield.The Shark Shield is worn on the thigh or ankle, or it can be mounted on a surfboard.Sydney-based Ocean Guardian's eSpear utilizes that same system, but it takes the form a "gun" that can be carried in an optional thigh holster, then pulled out when needed. If users think that a shark is getting a little too close, they squeeze the trigger. Doing so causes a forward section of the device to slide/pivot out from the main body, exposing two electrodes to the water. This, in turn, instantly creates an electrical field surrounding the device, measuring 1 meter across by 2.5 m in length (3.3 by 8.2 ft). OPS: The Ocean Guardian eSpear Picture supplied by Ferrari

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Ferrari Press Agency Ref 10092 Shark 1 06/02/2019 See Ferrari text Picture must credit: Ocean Guardian Surfers, swimmers and scuba divers in high shark attack risk waters can make themselves safer with an electronic speargun-like gadget called the eSpear.Once fired in the water at one of the threatening fish, it send s out a three-dimensional electrical field When sharks enter this field, their electro-receptive system is disrupted, causing them to experience muscle spasms and severe discomfort.Although they're not actually harmed, they are motivated to immediately leave the area.It has been developed in Australia based on a previous anti-shark device called Shark Shield.The Shark Shield is worn on the thigh or ankle, or it can be mounted on a surfboard.Sydney-based Ocean Guardian's eSpear utilizes that same system, but it takes the form a "gun" that can be carried in an optional thigh holster, then pulled out when needed. If users think that a shark is getting a little too close, they squeeze the trigger. Doing so causes a forward section of the device to slide/pivot out from the main body, exposing two electrodes to the water. This, in turn, instantly creates an electrical field surrounding the device, measuring 1 meter across by 2.5 m in length (3.3 by 8.2 ft). OPS: The Ocean Guardian eSpear being demonstrated on a shark. As the shark approaches the diver triggers the eSpear Picture supplied by Ferrari

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Ferrari Press Agency Ref 10092 Shark 1 06/02/2019 See Ferrari text Picture must credit: Ocean Guardian Surfers, swimmers and scuba divers in high shark attack risk waters can make themselves safer with an electronic speargun-like gadget called the eSpear.Once fired in the water at one of the threatening fish, it send s out a three-dimensional electrical field When sharks enter this field, their electro-receptive system is disrupted, causing them to experience muscle spasms and severe discomfort.Although they're not actually harmed, they are motivated to immediately leave the area.It has been developed in Australia based on a previous anti-shark device called Shark Shield.The Shark Shield is worn on the thigh or ankle, or it can be mounted on a surfboard.Sydney-based Ocean Guardian's eSpear utilizes that same system, but it takes the form a "gun" that can be carried in an optional thigh holster, then pulled out when needed. If users think that a shark is getting a little too close, they squeeze the trigger. Doing so causes a forward section of the device to slide/pivot out from the main body, exposing two electrodes to the water. This, in turn, instantly creates an electrical field surrounding the device, measuring 1 meter across by 2.5 m in length (3.3 by 8.2 ft). OPS: The Ocean Guardian eSpear Picture supplied by Ferrari

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Ferrari Press Agency Ref 10092 Shark 1 06/02/2019 See Ferrari text Picture must credit: Ocean Guardian Surfers, swimmers and scuba divers in high shark attack risk waters can make themselves safer with an electronic speargun-like gadget called the eSpear.Once fired in the water at one of the threatening fish, it send s out a three-dimensional electrical field When sharks enter this field, their electro-receptive system is disrupted, causing them to experience muscle spasms and severe discomfort.Although they're not actually harmed, they are motivated to immediately leave the area.It has been developed in Australia based on a previous anti-shark device called Shark Shield.The Shark Shield is worn on the thigh or ankle, or it can be mounted on a surfboard.Sydney-based Ocean Guardian's eSpear utilizes that same system, but it takes the form a "gun" that can be carried in an optional thigh holster, then pulled out when needed. If users think that a shark is getting a little too close, they squeeze the trigger. Doing so causes a forward section of the device to slide/pivot out from the main body, exposing two electrodes to the water. This, in turn, instantly creates an electrical field surrounding the device, measuring 1 meter across by 2.5 m in length (3.3 by 8.2 ft). OPS: The Ocean Guardian eSpear Picture supplied by Ferrari

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Ferrari Press Agency Ref 10092 Shark 1 06/02/2019 See Ferrari text Picture must credit: Ocean Guardian Surfers, swimmers and scuba divers in high shark attack risk waters can make themselves safer with an electronic speargun-like gadget called the eSpear.Once fired in the water at one of the threatening fish, it send s out a three-dimensional electrical field When sharks enter this field, their electro-receptive system is disrupted, causing them to experience muscle spasms and severe discomfort.Although they're not actually harmed, they are motivated to immediately leave the area.It has been developed in Australia based on a previous anti-shark device called Shark Shield.The Shark Shield is worn on the thigh or ankle, or it can be mounted on a surfboard.Sydney-based Ocean Guardian's eSpear utilizes that same system, but it takes the form a "gun" that can be carried in an optional thigh holster, then pulled out when needed. If users think that a shark is getting a little too close, they squeeze the trigger. Doing so causes a forward section of the device to slide/pivot out from the main body, exposing two electrodes to the water. This, in turn, instantly creates an electrical field surrounding the device, measuring 1 meter across by 2.5 m in length (3.3 by 8.2 ft). OPS: The Ocean Guardian eSpear Picture supplied by Ferrari

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Ferrari Press Agency Ref 10092 Shark 1 06/02/2019 See Ferrari text Picture must credit: Ocean Guardian Surfers, swimmers and scuba divers in high shark attack risk waters can make themselves safer with an electronic speargun-like gadget called the eSpear.Once fired in the water at one of the threatening fish, it send s out a three-dimensional electrical field When sharks enter this field, their electro-receptive system is disrupted, causing them to experience muscle spasms and severe discomfort.Although they're not actually harmed, they are motivated to immediately leave the area.It has been developed in Australia based on a previous anti-shark device called Shark Shield.The Shark Shield is worn on the thigh or ankle, or it can be mounted on a surfboard.Sydney-based Ocean Guardian's eSpear utilizes that same system, but it takes the form a "gun" that can be carried in an optional thigh holster, then pulled out when needed. If users think that a shark is getting a little too close, they squeeze the trigger. Doing so causes a forward section of the device to slide/pivot out from the main body, exposing two electrodes to the water. This, in turn, instantly creates an electrical field surrounding the device, measuring 1 meter across by 2.5 m in length (3.3 by 8.2 ft). OPS: The Ocean Guardian eSpear Picture supplied by Ferrari

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Ferrari Press Agency Ref 10092 Shark 1 06/02/2019 See Ferrari text Picture must credit: Ocean Guardian Surfers, swimmers and scuba divers in high shark attack risk waters can make themselves safer with an electronic speargun-like gadget called the eSpear.Once fired in the water at one of the threatening fish, it send s out a three-dimensional electrical field When sharks enter this field, their electro-receptive system is disrupted, causing them to experience muscle spasms and severe discomfort.Although they're not actually harmed, they are motivated to immediately leave the area.It has been developed in Australia based on a previous anti-shark device called Shark Shield.The Shark Shield is worn on the thigh or ankle, or it can be mounted on a surfboard.Sydney-based Ocean Guardian's eSpear utilizes that same system, but it takes the form a "gun" that can be carried in an optional thigh holster, then pulled out when needed. If users think that a shark is getting a little too close, they squeeze the trigger. Doing so causes a forward section of the device to slide/pivot out from the main body, exposing two electrodes to the water. This, in turn, instantly creates an electrical field surrounding the device, measuring 1 meter across by 2.5 m in length (3.3 by 8.2 ft). OPS: The Ocean Guardian eSpear being demonstrated on a shark. The shark senses the electrical field and turns Picture supplied by Ferrari