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Chornobyl Exclusion Zone 2021 (85)

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Unfortunately, no trace of the electrical switchboard remains. CHERNOBYL, UKRAINE: FASCINATING images offer an incredibly rare insight into the radioactive corridors of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant. Incredible photos taken inside the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant revealed the never-ending corridors and miles of cables inside the sarcophagus ? which was built after the nuclear disaster to limit the levels of radiation that were being emitted. Further pictures showed porcelain tableware featuring the powerplant?s logo, smashed clocks, and archaic telephone switchboard inside the power plant?s administrative building which is now abandoned. In another eye opening image the airtight caissons and hot chambers - where radioactive waste is cut, shredded and sorted by radioactivity level and compressed before being incinerated - were revealed. The fascinating pictures were taken at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in Ukraine by photographer Arkadiusz Podniesi?ski (48) from Wroc?aw, Poland. Arkadiusz spent two days at the site in March 2021 and used a Nikon D850 camera to take his images. He has been documenting the effects of the Chernobyl disaster since 2008, focusing on the continual problems associated with radioactive contamination of the environment. On April 26, 1986, Chernobyl suffered the world?s worst nuclear disaster. An experiment designed to test the safety of the power plant went wrong, causing a reactor explosion and fire which spewed radiation for 10 days. Those living close to Chernobyl ? over 100,000 people ? were quickly rushed from the scene. A 20-mile exclusion zone was imposed around the damaged reactor. This was later expanded to cover more affected areas. Clouds carrying radioactive particles drifted across Europe, causing decades of havoc for hundreds of thousands of people, both near the epicentre and thousands of miles away. Due to his ongoing work documenting the effects of the nuclear disaster, Arkadiusz gained exclusive access inside the p

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The exterior of one of the administrative buildings. CHERNOBYL, UKRAINE: FASCINATING images offer an incredibly rare insight into the radioactive corridors of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant. Incredible photos taken inside the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant revealed the never-ending corridors and miles of cables inside the sarcophagus ? which was built after the nuclear disaster to limit the levels of radiation that were being emitted. Further pictures showed porcelain tableware featuring the powerplant?s logo, smashed clocks, and archaic telephone switchboard inside the power plant?s administrative building which is now abandoned. In another eye opening image the airtight caissons and hot chambers - where radioactive waste is cut, shredded and sorted by radioactivity level and compressed before being incinerated - were revealed. The fascinating pictures were taken at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in Ukraine by photographer Arkadiusz Podniesi?ski (48) from Wroc?aw, Poland. Arkadiusz spent two days at the site in March 2021 and used a Nikon D850 camera to take his images. He has been documenting the effects of the Chernobyl disaster since 2008, focusing on the continual problems associated with radioactive contamination of the environment. On April 26, 1986, Chernobyl suffered the world?s worst nuclear disaster. An experiment designed to test the safety of the power plant went wrong, causing a reactor explosion and fire which spewed radiation for 10 days. Those living close to Chernobyl ? over 100,000 people ? were quickly rushed from the scene. A 20-mile exclusion zone was imposed around the damaged reactor. This was later expanded to cover more affected areas. Clouds carrying radioactive particles drifted across Europe, causing decades of havoc for hundreds of thousands of people, both near the epicentre and thousands of miles away. Due to his ongoing work documenting the effects of the nuclear disaster, Arkadiusz gained exclusive access inside the power plant

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Nuclear symbols are located all throughout the plant. CHERNOBYL, UKRAINE: FASCINATING images offer an incredibly rare insight into the radioactive corridors of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant. Incredible photos taken inside the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant revealed the never-ending corridors and miles of cables inside the sarcophagus ? which was built after the nuclear disaster to limit the levels of radiation that were being emitted. Further pictures showed porcelain tableware featuring the powerplant?s logo, smashed clocks, and archaic telephone switchboard inside the power plant?s administrative building which is now abandoned. In another eye opening image the airtight caissons and hot chambers - where radioactive waste is cut, shredded and sorted by radioactivity level and compressed before being incinerated - were revealed. The fascinating pictures were taken at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in Ukraine by photographer Arkadiusz Podniesi?ski (48) from Wroc?aw, Poland. Arkadiusz spent two days at the site in March 2021 and used a Nikon D850 camera to take his images. He has been documenting the effects of the Chernobyl disaster since 2008, focusing on the continual problems associated with radioactive contamination of the environment. On April 26, 1986, Chernobyl suffered the world?s worst nuclear disaster. An experiment designed to test the safety of the power plant went wrong, causing a reactor explosion and fire which spewed radiation for 10 days. Those living close to Chernobyl ? over 100,000 people ? were quickly rushed from the scene. A 20-mile exclusion zone was imposed around the damaged reactor. This was later expanded to cover more affected areas. Clouds carrying radioactive particles drifted across Europe, causing decades of havoc for hundreds of thousands of people, both near the epicentre and thousands of miles away. Due to his ongoing work documenting the effects of the nuclear disaster, Arkadiusz gained exclusive access inside the power plan

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At first, the radiation is relatively low. CHERNOBYL, UKRAINE: FASCINATING images offer an incredibly rare insight into the radioactive corridors of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant. Incredible photos taken inside the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant revealed the never-ending corridors and miles of cables inside the sarcophagus ? which was built after the nuclear disaster to limit the levels of radiation that were being emitted. Further pictures showed porcelain tableware featuring the powerplant?s logo, smashed clocks, and archaic telephone switchboard inside the power plant?s administrative building which is now abandoned. In another eye opening image the airtight caissons and hot chambers - where radioactive waste is cut, shredded and sorted by radioactivity level and compressed before being incinerated - were revealed. The fascinating pictures were taken at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in Ukraine by photographer Arkadiusz Podniesi?ski (48) from Wroc?aw, Poland. Arkadiusz spent two days at the site in March 2021 and used a Nikon D850 camera to take his images. He has been documenting the effects of the Chernobyl disaster since 2008, focusing on the continual problems associated with radioactive contamination of the environment. On April 26, 1986, Chernobyl suffered the world?s worst nuclear disaster. An experiment designed to test the safety of the power plant went wrong, causing a reactor explosion and fire which spewed radiation for 10 days. Those living close to Chernobyl ? over 100,000 people ? were quickly rushed from the scene. A 20-mile exclusion zone was imposed around the damaged reactor. This was later expanded to cover more affected areas. Clouds carrying radioactive particles drifted across Europe, causing decades of havoc for hundreds of thousands of people, both near the epicentre and thousands of miles away. Due to his ongoing work documenting the effects of the nuclear disaster, Arkadiusz gained exclusive access inside the power plant which inc

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Nuclear waste storage drums. CHERNOBYL, UKRAINE: FASCINATING images offer an incredibly rare insight into the radioactive corridors of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant. Incredible photos taken inside the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant revealed the never-ending corridors and miles of cables inside the sarcophagus ? which was built after the nuclear disaster to limit the levels of radiation that were being emitted. Further pictures showed porcelain tableware featuring the powerplant?s logo, smashed clocks, and archaic telephone switchboard inside the power plant?s administrative building which is now abandoned. In another eye opening image the airtight caissons and hot chambers - where radioactive waste is cut, shredded and sorted by radioactivity level and compressed before being incinerated - were revealed. The fascinating pictures were taken at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in Ukraine by photographer Arkadiusz Podniesi?ski (48) from Wroc?aw, Poland. Arkadiusz spent two days at the site in March 2021 and used a Nikon D850 camera to take his images. He has been documenting the effects of the Chernobyl disaster since 2008, focusing on the continual problems associated with radioactive contamination of the environment. On April 26, 1986, Chernobyl suffered the world?s worst nuclear disaster. An experiment designed to test the safety of the power plant went wrong, causing a reactor explosion and fire which spewed radiation for 10 days. Those living close to Chernobyl ? over 100,000 people ? were quickly rushed from the scene. A 20-mile exclusion zone was imposed around the damaged reactor. This was later expanded to cover more affected areas. Clouds carrying radioactive particles drifted across Europe, causing decades of havoc for hundreds of thousands of people, both near the epicentre and thousands of miles away. Due to his ongoing work documenting the effects of the nuclear disaster, Arkadiusz gained exclusive access inside the power plant which included a rare t

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Porcelain tableware emblazoned with the power plant?s logo. CHERNOBYL, UKRAINE: FASCINATING images offer an incredibly rare insight into the radioactive corridors of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant. Incredible photos taken inside the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant revealed the never-ending corridors and miles of cables inside the sarcophagus ? which was built after the nuclear disaster to limit the levels of radiation that were being emitted. Further pictures showed porcelain tableware featuring the powerplant?s logo, smashed clocks, and archaic telephone switchboard inside the power plant?s administrative building which is now abandoned. In another eye opening image the airtight caissons and hot chambers - where radioactive waste is cut, shredded and sorted by radioactivity level and compressed before being incinerated - were revealed. The fascinating pictures were taken at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in Ukraine by photographer Arkadiusz Podniesi?ski (48) from Wroc?aw, Poland. Arkadiusz spent two days at the site in March 2021 and used a Nikon D850 camera to take his images. He has been documenting the effects of the Chernobyl disaster since 2008, focusing on the continual problems associated with radioactive contamination of the environment. On April 26, 1986, Chernobyl suffered the world?s worst nuclear disaster. An experiment designed to test the safety of the power plant went wrong, causing a reactor explosion and fire which spewed radiation for 10 days. Those living close to Chernobyl ? over 100,000 people ? were quickly rushed from the scene. A 20-mile exclusion zone was imposed around the damaged reactor. This was later expanded to cover more affected areas. Clouds carrying radioactive particles drifted across Europe, causing decades of havoc for hundreds of thousands of people, both near the epicentre and thousands of miles away. Due to his ongoing work documenting the effects of the nuclear disaster, Arkadiusz gained exclusive access inside the powe

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Operating one of the control panels. CHERNOBYL, UKRAINE: FASCINATING images offer an incredibly rare insight into the radioactive corridors of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant. Incredible photos taken inside the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant revealed the never-ending corridors and miles of cables inside the sarcophagus ? which was built after the nuclear disaster to limit the levels of radiation that were being emitted. Further pictures showed porcelain tableware featuring the powerplant?s logo, smashed clocks, and archaic telephone switchboard inside the power plant?s administrative building which is now abandoned. In another eye opening image the airtight caissons and hot chambers - where radioactive waste is cut, shredded and sorted by radioactivity level and compressed before being incinerated - were revealed. The fascinating pictures were taken at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in Ukraine by photographer Arkadiusz Podniesi?ski (48) from Wroc?aw, Poland. Arkadiusz spent two days at the site in March 2021 and used a Nikon D850 camera to take his images. He has been documenting the effects of the Chernobyl disaster since 2008, focusing on the continual problems associated with radioactive contamination of the environment. On April 26, 1986, Chernobyl suffered the world?s worst nuclear disaster. An experiment designed to test the safety of the power plant went wrong, causing a reactor explosion and fire which spewed radiation for 10 days. Those living close to Chernobyl ? over 100,000 people ? were quickly rushed from the scene. A 20-mile exclusion zone was imposed around the damaged reactor. This was later expanded to cover more affected areas. Clouds carrying radioactive particles drifted across Europe, causing decades of havoc for hundreds of thousands of people, both near the epicentre and thousands of miles away. Due to his ongoing work documenting the effects of the nuclear disaster, Arkadiusz gained exclusive access inside the power plant which included

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One of the plant's control panel rooms. CHERNOBYL, UKRAINE: FASCINATING images offer an incredibly rare insight into the radioactive corridors of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant. Incredible photos taken inside the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant revealed the never-ending corridors and miles of cables inside the sarcophagus ? which was built after the nuclear disaster to limit the levels of radiation that were being emitted. Further pictures showed porcelain tableware featuring the powerplant?s logo, smashed clocks, and archaic telephone switchboard inside the power plant?s administrative building which is now abandoned. In another eye opening image the airtight caissons and hot chambers - where radioactive waste is cut, shredded and sorted by radioactivity level and compressed before being incinerated - were revealed. The fascinating pictures were taken at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in Ukraine by photographer Arkadiusz Podniesi?ski (48) from Wroc?aw, Poland. Arkadiusz spent two days at the site in March 2021 and used a Nikon D850 camera to take his images. He has been documenting the effects of the Chernobyl disaster since 2008, focusing on the continual problems associated with radioactive contamination of the environment. On April 26, 1986, Chernobyl suffered the world?s worst nuclear disaster. An experiment designed to test the safety of the power plant went wrong, causing a reactor explosion and fire which spewed radiation for 10 days. Those living close to Chernobyl ? over 100,000 people ? were quickly rushed from the scene. A 20-mile exclusion zone was imposed around the damaged reactor. This was later expanded to cover more affected areas. Clouds carrying radioactive particles drifted across Europe, causing decades of havoc for hundreds of thousands of people, both near the epicentre and thousands of miles away. Due to his ongoing work documenting the effects of the nuclear disaster, Arkadiusz gained exclusive access inside the power plant which includ

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Concrete modules used to store the canisters. CHERNOBYL, UKRAINE: FASCINATING images offer an incredibly rare insight into the radioactive corridors of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant. Incredible photos taken inside the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant revealed the never-ending corridors and miles of cables inside the sarcophagus ? which was built after the nuclear disaster to limit the levels of radiation that were being emitted. Further pictures showed porcelain tableware featuring the powerplant?s logo, smashed clocks, and archaic telephone switchboard inside the power plant?s administrative building which is now abandoned. In another eye opening image the airtight caissons and hot chambers - where radioactive waste is cut, shredded and sorted by radioactivity level and compressed before being incinerated - were revealed. The fascinating pictures were taken at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in Ukraine by photographer Arkadiusz Podniesi?ski (48) from Wroc?aw, Poland. Arkadiusz spent two days at the site in March 2021 and used a Nikon D850 camera to take his images. He has been documenting the effects of the Chernobyl disaster since 2008, focusing on the continual problems associated with radioactive contamination of the environment. On April 26, 1986, Chernobyl suffered the world?s worst nuclear disaster. An experiment designed to test the safety of the power plant went wrong, causing a reactor explosion and fire which spewed radiation for 10 days. Those living close to Chernobyl ? over 100,000 people ? were quickly rushed from the scene. A 20-mile exclusion zone was imposed around the damaged reactor. This was later expanded to cover more affected areas. Clouds carrying radioactive particles drifted across Europe, causing decades of havoc for hundreds of thousands of people, both near the epicentre and thousands of miles away. Due to his ongoing work documenting the effects of the nuclear disaster, Arkadiusz gained exclusive access inside the power plant which

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The exterior of the plant. CHERNOBYL, UKRAINE: FASCINATING images offer an incredibly rare insight into the radioactive corridors of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant. Incredible photos taken inside the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant revealed the never-ending corridors and miles of cables inside the sarcophagus ? which was built after the nuclear disaster to limit the levels of radiation that were being emitted. Further pictures showed porcelain tableware featuring the powerplant?s logo, smashed clocks, and archaic telephone switchboard inside the power plant?s administrative building which is now abandoned. In another eye opening image the airtight caissons and hot chambers - where radioactive waste is cut, shredded and sorted by radioactivity level and compressed before being incinerated - were revealed. The fascinating pictures were taken at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in Ukraine by photographer Arkadiusz Podniesi?ski (48) from Wroc?aw, Poland. Arkadiusz spent two days at the site in March 2021 and used a Nikon D850 camera to take his images. He has been documenting the effects of the Chernobyl disaster since 2008, focusing on the continual problems associated with radioactive contamination of the environment. On April 26, 1986, Chernobyl suffered the world?s worst nuclear disaster. An experiment designed to test the safety of the power plant went wrong, causing a reactor explosion and fire which spewed radiation for 10 days. Those living close to Chernobyl ? over 100,000 people ? were quickly rushed from the scene. A 20-mile exclusion zone was imposed around the damaged reactor. This was later expanded to cover more affected areas. Clouds carrying radioactive particles drifted across Europe, causing decades of havoc for hundreds of thousands of people, both near the epicentre and thousands of miles away. Due to his ongoing work documenting the effects of the nuclear disaster, Arkadiusz gained exclusive access inside the power plant which included a rare tou

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Changing shoes before entering the dirty zone. CHERNOBYL, UKRAINE: FASCINATING images offer an incredibly rare insight into the radioactive corridors of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant. Incredible photos taken inside the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant revealed the never-ending corridors and miles of cables inside the sarcophagus ? which was built after the nuclear disaster to limit the levels of radiation that were being emitted. Further pictures showed porcelain tableware featuring the powerplant?s logo, smashed clocks, and archaic telephone switchboard inside the power plant?s administrative building which is now abandoned. In another eye opening image the airtight caissons and hot chambers - where radioactive waste is cut, shredded and sorted by radioactivity level and compressed before being incinerated - were revealed. The fascinating pictures were taken at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in Ukraine by photographer Arkadiusz Podniesi?ski (48) from Wroc?aw, Poland. Arkadiusz spent two days at the site in March 2021 and used a Nikon D850 camera to take his images. He has been documenting the effects of the Chernobyl disaster since 2008, focusing on the continual problems associated with radioactive contamination of the environment. On April 26, 1986, Chernobyl suffered the world?s worst nuclear disaster. An experiment designed to test the safety of the power plant went wrong, causing a reactor explosion and fire which spewed radiation for 10 days. Those living close to Chernobyl ? over 100,000 people ? were quickly rushed from the scene. A 20-mile exclusion zone was imposed around the damaged reactor. This was later expanded to cover more affected areas. Clouds carrying radioactive particles drifted across Europe, causing decades of havoc for hundreds of thousands of people, both near the epicentre and thousands of miles away. Due to his ongoing work documenting the effects of the nuclear disaster, Arkadiusz gained exclusive access inside the power plant which

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Dark concrete tunnels run through the plant lined with electrical cables. CHERNOBYL, UKRAINE: FASCINATING images offer an incredibly rare insight into the radioactive corridors of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant. Incredible photos taken inside the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant revealed the never-ending corridors and miles of cables inside the sarcophagus ? which was built after the nuclear disaster to limit the levels of radiation that were being emitted. Further pictures showed porcelain tableware featuring the powerplant?s logo, smashed clocks, and archaic telephone switchboard inside the power plant?s administrative building which is now abandoned. In another eye opening image the airtight caissons and hot chambers - where radioactive waste is cut, shredded and sorted by radioactivity level and compressed before being incinerated - were revealed. The fascinating pictures were taken at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in Ukraine by photographer Arkadiusz Podniesi?ski (48) from Wroc?aw, Poland. Arkadiusz spent two days at the site in March 2021 and used a Nikon D850 camera to take his images. He has been documenting the effects of the Chernobyl disaster since 2008, focusing on the continual problems associated with radioactive contamination of the environment. On April 26, 1986, Chernobyl suffered the world?s worst nuclear disaster. An experiment designed to test the safety of the power plant went wrong, causing a reactor explosion and fire which spewed radiation for 10 days. Those living close to Chernobyl ? over 100,000 people ? were quickly rushed from the scene. A 20-mile exclusion zone was imposed around the damaged reactor. This was later expanded to cover more affected areas. Clouds carrying radioactive particles drifted across Europe, causing decades of havoc for hundreds of thousands of people, both near the epicentre and thousands of miles away. Due to his ongoing work documenting the effects of the nuclear disaster, Arkadiusz gained exclusive access i

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The fuel assemblies. CHERNOBYL, UKRAINE: FASCINATING images offer an incredibly rare insight into the radioactive corridors of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant. Incredible photos taken inside the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant revealed the never-ending corridors and miles of cables inside the sarcophagus ? which was built after the nuclear disaster to limit the levels of radiation that were being emitted. Further pictures showed porcelain tableware featuring the powerplant?s logo, smashed clocks, and archaic telephone switchboard inside the power plant?s administrative building which is now abandoned. In another eye opening image the airtight caissons and hot chambers - where radioactive waste is cut, shredded and sorted by radioactivity level and compressed before being incinerated - were revealed. The fascinating pictures were taken at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in Ukraine by photographer Arkadiusz Podniesi?ski (48) from Wroc?aw, Poland. Arkadiusz spent two days at the site in March 2021 and used a Nikon D850 camera to take his images. He has been documenting the effects of the Chernobyl disaster since 2008, focusing on the continual problems associated with radioactive contamination of the environment. On April 26, 1986, Chernobyl suffered the world?s worst nuclear disaster. An experiment designed to test the safety of the power plant went wrong, causing a reactor explosion and fire which spewed radiation for 10 days. Those living close to Chernobyl ? over 100,000 people ? were quickly rushed from the scene. A 20-mile exclusion zone was imposed around the damaged reactor. This was later expanded to cover more affected areas. Clouds carrying radioactive particles drifted across Europe, causing decades of havoc for hundreds of thousands of people, both near the epicentre and thousands of miles away. Due to his ongoing work documenting the effects of the nuclear disaster, Arkadiusz gained exclusive access inside the power plant which included a rare tour insi

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Miles and miles of pipes and electrical cables are visible everywhere. CHERNOBYL, UKRAINE: FASCINATING images offer an incredibly rare insight into the radioactive corridors of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant. Incredible photos taken inside the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant revealed the never-ending corridors and miles of cables inside the sarcophagus ? which was built after the nuclear disaster to limit the levels of radiation that were being emitted. Further pictures showed porcelain tableware featuring the powerplant?s logo, smashed clocks, and archaic telephone switchboard inside the power plant?s administrative building which is now abandoned. In another eye opening image the airtight caissons and hot chambers - where radioactive waste is cut, shredded and sorted by radioactivity level and compressed before being incinerated - were revealed. The fascinating pictures were taken at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in Ukraine by photographer Arkadiusz Podniesi?ski (48) from Wroc?aw, Poland. Arkadiusz spent two days at the site in March 2021 and used a Nikon D850 camera to take his images. He has been documenting the effects of the Chernobyl disaster since 2008, focusing on the continual problems associated with radioactive contamination of the environment. On April 26, 1986, Chernobyl suffered the world?s worst nuclear disaster. An experiment designed to test the safety of the power plant went wrong, causing a reactor explosion and fire which spewed radiation for 10 days. Those living close to Chernobyl ? over 100,000 people ? were quickly rushed from the scene. A 20-mile exclusion zone was imposed around the damaged reactor. This was later expanded to cover more affected areas. Clouds carrying radioactive particles drifted across Europe, causing decades of havoc for hundreds of thousands of people, both near the epicentre and thousands of miles away. Due to his ongoing work documenting the effects of the nuclear disaster, Arkadiusz gained exclusive access insi

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Underground bunker in the basement of BK-2. CHERNOBYL, UKRAINE: FASCINATING images offer an incredibly rare insight into the radioactive corridors of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant. Incredible photos taken inside the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant revealed the never-ending corridors and miles of cables inside the sarcophagus ? which was built after the nuclear disaster to limit the levels of radiation that were being emitted. Further pictures showed porcelain tableware featuring the powerplant?s logo, smashed clocks, and archaic telephone switchboard inside the power plant?s administrative building which is now abandoned. In another eye opening image the airtight caissons and hot chambers - where radioactive waste is cut, shredded and sorted by radioactivity level and compressed before being incinerated - were revealed. The fascinating pictures were taken at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in Ukraine by photographer Arkadiusz Podniesi?ski (48) from Wroc?aw, Poland. Arkadiusz spent two days at the site in March 2021 and used a Nikon D850 camera to take his images. He has been documenting the effects of the Chernobyl disaster since 2008, focusing on the continual problems associated with radioactive contamination of the environment. On April 26, 1986, Chernobyl suffered the world?s worst nuclear disaster. An experiment designed to test the safety of the power plant went wrong, causing a reactor explosion and fire which spewed radiation for 10 days. Those living close to Chernobyl ? over 100,000 people ? were quickly rushed from the scene. A 20-mile exclusion zone was imposed around the damaged reactor. This was later expanded to cover more affected areas. Clouds carrying radioactive particles drifted across Europe, causing decades of havoc for hundreds of thousands of people, both near the epicentre and thousands of miles away. Due to his ongoing work documenting the effects of the nuclear disaster, Arkadiusz gained exclusive access inside the power plant which in

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Room 101/3: the electrical switchboard. CHERNOBYL, UKRAINE: FASCINATING images offer an incredibly rare insight into the radioactive corridors of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant. Incredible photos taken inside the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant revealed the never-ending corridors and miles of cables inside the sarcophagus ? which was built after the nuclear disaster to limit the levels of radiation that were being emitted. Further pictures showed porcelain tableware featuring the powerplant?s logo, smashed clocks, and archaic telephone switchboard inside the power plant?s administrative building which is now abandoned. In another eye opening image the airtight caissons and hot chambers - where radioactive waste is cut, shredded and sorted by radioactivity level and compressed before being incinerated - were revealed. The fascinating pictures were taken at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in Ukraine by photographer Arkadiusz Podniesi?ski (48) from Wroc?aw, Poland. Arkadiusz spent two days at the site in March 2021 and used a Nikon D850 camera to take his images. He has been documenting the effects of the Chernobyl disaster since 2008, focusing on the continual problems associated with radioactive contamination of the environment. On April 26, 1986, Chernobyl suffered the world?s worst nuclear disaster. An experiment designed to test the safety of the power plant went wrong, causing a reactor explosion and fire which spewed radiation for 10 days. Those living close to Chernobyl ? over 100,000 people ? were quickly rushed from the scene. A 20-mile exclusion zone was imposed around the damaged reactor. This was later expanded to cover more affected areas. Clouds carrying radioactive particles drifted across Europe, causing decades of havoc for hundreds of thousands of people, both near the epicentre and thousands of miles away. Due to his ongoing work documenting the effects of the nuclear disaster, Arkadiusz gained exclusive access inside the power plant which includ

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Electrical cables line the corridors. CHERNOBYL, UKRAINE: FASCINATING images offer an incredibly rare insight into the radioactive corridors of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant. Incredible photos taken inside the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant revealed the never-ending corridors and miles of cables inside the sarcophagus ? which was built after the nuclear disaster to limit the levels of radiation that were being emitted. Further pictures showed porcelain tableware featuring the powerplant?s logo, smashed clocks, and archaic telephone switchboard inside the power plant?s administrative building which is now abandoned. In another eye opening image the airtight caissons and hot chambers - where radioactive waste is cut, shredded and sorted by radioactivity level and compressed before being incinerated - were revealed. The fascinating pictures were taken at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in Ukraine by photographer Arkadiusz Podniesi?ski (48) from Wroc?aw, Poland. Arkadiusz spent two days at the site in March 2021 and used a Nikon D850 camera to take his images. He has been documenting the effects of the Chernobyl disaster since 2008, focusing on the continual problems associated with radioactive contamination of the environment. On April 26, 1986, Chernobyl suffered the world?s worst nuclear disaster. An experiment designed to test the safety of the power plant went wrong, causing a reactor explosion and fire which spewed radiation for 10 days. Those living close to Chernobyl ? over 100,000 people ? were quickly rushed from the scene. A 20-mile exclusion zone was imposed around the damaged reactor. This was later expanded to cover more affected areas. Clouds carrying radioactive particles drifted across Europe, causing decades of havoc for hundreds of thousands of people, both near the epicentre and thousands of miles away. Due to his ongoing work documenting the effects of the nuclear disaster, Arkadiusz gained exclusive access inside the power plant which included

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The old sarcophagus. CHERNOBYL, UKRAINE: FASCINATING images offer an incredibly rare insight into the radioactive corridors of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant. Incredible photos taken inside the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant revealed the never-ending corridors and miles of cables inside the sarcophagus ? which was built after the nuclear disaster to limit the levels of radiation that were being emitted. Further pictures showed porcelain tableware featuring the powerplant?s logo, smashed clocks, and archaic telephone switchboard inside the power plant?s administrative building which is now abandoned. In another eye opening image the airtight caissons and hot chambers - where radioactive waste is cut, shredded and sorted by radioactivity level and compressed before being incinerated - were revealed. The fascinating pictures were taken at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in Ukraine by photographer Arkadiusz Podniesi?ski (48) from Wroc?aw, Poland. Arkadiusz spent two days at the site in March 2021 and used a Nikon D850 camera to take his images. He has been documenting the effects of the Chernobyl disaster since 2008, focusing on the continual problems associated with radioactive contamination of the environment. On April 26, 1986, Chernobyl suffered the world?s worst nuclear disaster. An experiment designed to test the safety of the power plant went wrong, causing a reactor explosion and fire which spewed radiation for 10 days. Those living close to Chernobyl ? over 100,000 people ? were quickly rushed from the scene. A 20-mile exclusion zone was imposed around the damaged reactor. This was later expanded to cover more affected areas. Clouds carrying radioactive particles drifted across Europe, causing decades of havoc for hundreds of thousands of people, both near the epicentre and thousands of miles away. Due to his ongoing work documenting the effects of the nuclear disaster, Arkadiusz gained exclusive access inside the power plant which included a rare tour insi

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The plant's electronic workshop. CHERNOBYL, UKRAINE: FASCINATING images offer an incredibly rare insight into the radioactive corridors of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant. Incredible photos taken inside the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant revealed the never-ending corridors and miles of cables inside the sarcophagus ? which was built after the nuclear disaster to limit the levels of radiation that were being emitted. Further pictures showed porcelain tableware featuring the powerplant?s logo, smashed clocks, and archaic telephone switchboard inside the power plant?s administrative building which is now abandoned. In another eye opening image the airtight caissons and hot chambers - where radioactive waste is cut, shredded and sorted by radioactivity level and compressed before being incinerated - were revealed. The fascinating pictures were taken at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in Ukraine by photographer Arkadiusz Podniesi?ski (48) from Wroc?aw, Poland. Arkadiusz spent two days at the site in March 2021 and used a Nikon D850 camera to take his images. He has been documenting the effects of the Chernobyl disaster since 2008, focusing on the continual problems associated with radioactive contamination of the environment. On April 26, 1986, Chernobyl suffered the world?s worst nuclear disaster. An experiment designed to test the safety of the power plant went wrong, causing a reactor explosion and fire which spewed radiation for 10 days. Those living close to Chernobyl ? over 100,000 people ? were quickly rushed from the scene. A 20-mile exclusion zone was imposed around the damaged reactor. This was later expanded to cover more affected areas. Clouds carrying radioactive particles drifted across Europe, causing decades of havoc for hundreds of thousands of people, both near the epicentre and thousands of miles away. Due to his ongoing work documenting the effects of the nuclear disaster, Arkadiusz gained exclusive access inside the power plant which included a ra

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EN_01474964_0020

View from the roof of BK-2 towards Unit 3. CHERNOBYL, UKRAINE: FASCINATING images offer an incredibly rare insight into the radioactive corridors of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant. Incredible photos taken inside the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant revealed the never-ending corridors and miles of cables inside the sarcophagus ? which was built after the nuclear disaster to limit the levels of radiation that were being emitted. Further pictures showed porcelain tableware featuring the powerplant?s logo, smashed clocks, and archaic telephone switchboard inside the power plant?s administrative building which is now abandoned. In another eye opening image the airtight caissons and hot chambers - where radioactive waste is cut, shredded and sorted by radioactivity level and compressed before being incinerated - were revealed. The fascinating pictures were taken at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in Ukraine by photographer Arkadiusz Podniesi?ski (48) from Wroc?aw, Poland. Arkadiusz spent two days at the site in March 2021 and used a Nikon D850 camera to take his images. He has been documenting the effects of the Chernobyl disaster since 2008, focusing on the continual problems associated with radioactive contamination of the environment. On April 26, 1986, Chernobyl suffered the world?s worst nuclear disaster. An experiment designed to test the safety of the power plant went wrong, causing a reactor explosion and fire which spewed radiation for 10 days. Those living close to Chernobyl ? over 100,000 people ? were quickly rushed from the scene. A 20-mile exclusion zone was imposed around the damaged reactor. This was later expanded to cover more affected areas. Clouds carrying radioactive particles drifted across Europe, causing decades of havoc for hundreds of thousands of people, both near the epicentre and thousands of miles away. Due to his ongoing work documenting the effects of the nuclear disaster, Arkadiusz gained exclusive access inside the power plant which inc

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EN_01474964_0021

Smashed office clocks in one of the rooms in BK-2. CHERNOBYL, UKRAINE: FASCINATING images offer an incredibly rare insight into the radioactive corridors of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant. Incredible photos taken inside the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant revealed the never-ending corridors and miles of cables inside the sarcophagus ? which was built after the nuclear disaster to limit the levels of radiation that were being emitted. Further pictures showed porcelain tableware featuring the powerplant?s logo, smashed clocks, and archaic telephone switchboard inside the power plant?s administrative building which is now abandoned. In another eye opening image the airtight caissons and hot chambers - where radioactive waste is cut, shredded and sorted by radioactivity level and compressed before being incinerated - were revealed. The fascinating pictures were taken at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in Ukraine by photographer Arkadiusz Podniesi?ski (48) from Wroc?aw, Poland. Arkadiusz spent two days at the site in March 2021 and used a Nikon D850 camera to take his images. He has been documenting the effects of the Chernobyl disaster since 2008, focusing on the continual problems associated with radioactive contamination of the environment. On April 26, 1986, Chernobyl suffered the world?s worst nuclear disaster. An experiment designed to test the safety of the power plant went wrong, causing a reactor explosion and fire which spewed radiation for 10 days. Those living close to Chernobyl ? over 100,000 people ? were quickly rushed from the scene. A 20-mile exclusion zone was imposed around the damaged reactor. This was later expanded to cover more affected areas. Clouds carrying radioactive particles drifted across Europe, causing decades of havoc for hundreds of thousands of people, both near the epicentre and thousands of miles away. Due to his ongoing work documenting the effects of the nuclear disaster, Arkadiusz gained exclusive access inside the power plant w

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EN_01474964_0022

Human radiation spectrometer test before and after visiting the power plant to determine the body?s radionuclide content. CHERNOBYL, UKRAINE: FASCINATING images offer an incredibly rare insight into the radioactive corridors of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant. Incredible photos taken inside the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant revealed the never-ending corridors and miles of cables inside the sarcophagus ? which was built after the nuclear disaster to limit the levels of radiation that were being emitted. Further pictures showed porcelain tableware featuring the powerplant?s logo, smashed clocks, and archaic telephone switchboard inside the power plant?s administrative building which is now abandoned. In another eye opening image the airtight caissons and hot chambers - where radioactive waste is cut, shredded and sorted by radioactivity level and compressed before being incinerated - were revealed. The fascinating pictures were taken at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in Ukraine by photographer Arkadiusz Podniesi?ski (48) from Wroc?aw, Poland. Arkadiusz spent two days at the site in March 2021 and used a Nikon D850 camera to take his images. He has been documenting the effects of the Chernobyl disaster since 2008, focusing on the continual problems associated with radioactive contamination of the environment. On April 26, 1986, Chernobyl suffered the world?s worst nuclear disaster. An experiment designed to test the safety of the power plant went wrong, causing a reactor explosion and fire which spewed radiation for 10 days. Those living close to Chernobyl ? over 100,000 people ? were quickly rushed from the scene. A 20-mile exclusion zone was imposed around the damaged reactor. This was later expanded to cover more affected areas. Clouds carrying radioactive particles drifted across Europe, causing decades of havoc for hundreds of thousands of people, both near the epicentre and thousands of miles away. Due to his ongoing work documenting the effects of the nucle

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EN_01474964_0023

Telephone switchboard in one of the offices in BK-2. CHERNOBYL, UKRAINE: FASCINATING images offer an incredibly rare insight into the radioactive corridors of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant. Incredible photos taken inside the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant revealed the never-ending corridors and miles of cables inside the sarcophagus ? which was built after the nuclear disaster to limit the levels of radiation that were being emitted. Further pictures showed porcelain tableware featuring the powerplant?s logo, smashed clocks, and archaic telephone switchboard inside the power plant?s administrative building which is now abandoned. In another eye opening image the airtight caissons and hot chambers - where radioactive waste is cut, shredded and sorted by radioactivity level and compressed before being incinerated - were revealed. The fascinating pictures were taken at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in Ukraine by photographer Arkadiusz Podniesi?ski (48) from Wroc?aw, Poland. Arkadiusz spent two days at the site in March 2021 and used a Nikon D850 camera to take his images. He has been documenting the effects of the Chernobyl disaster since 2008, focusing on the continual problems associated with radioactive contamination of the environment. On April 26, 1986, Chernobyl suffered the world?s worst nuclear disaster. An experiment designed to test the safety of the power plant went wrong, causing a reactor explosion and fire which spewed radiation for 10 days. Those living close to Chernobyl ? over 100,000 people ? were quickly rushed from the scene. A 20-mile exclusion zone was imposed around the damaged reactor. This was later expanded to cover more affected areas. Clouds carrying radioactive particles drifted across Europe, causing decades of havoc for hundreds of thousands of people, both near the epicentre and thousands of miles away. Due to his ongoing work documenting the effects of the nuclear disaster, Arkadiusz gained exclusive access inside the power plant

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EN_01474964_0024

Stairs leading to all levels of the old sarcophagus. CHERNOBYL, UKRAINE: FASCINATING images offer an incredibly rare insight into the radioactive corridors of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant. Incredible photos taken inside the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant revealed the never-ending corridors and miles of cables inside the sarcophagus ? which was built after the nuclear disaster to limit the levels of radiation that were being emitted. Further pictures showed porcelain tableware featuring the powerplant?s logo, smashed clocks, and archaic telephone switchboard inside the power plant?s administrative building which is now abandoned. In another eye opening image the airtight caissons and hot chambers - where radioactive waste is cut, shredded and sorted by radioactivity level and compressed before being incinerated - were revealed. The fascinating pictures were taken at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in Ukraine by photographer Arkadiusz Podniesi?ski (48) from Wroc?aw, Poland. Arkadiusz spent two days at the site in March 2021 and used a Nikon D850 camera to take his images. He has been documenting the effects of the Chernobyl disaster since 2008, focusing on the continual problems associated with radioactive contamination of the environment. On April 26, 1986, Chernobyl suffered the world?s worst nuclear disaster. An experiment designed to test the safety of the power plant went wrong, causing a reactor explosion and fire which spewed radiation for 10 days. Those living close to Chernobyl ? over 100,000 people ? were quickly rushed from the scene. A 20-mile exclusion zone was imposed around the damaged reactor. This was later expanded to cover more affected areas. Clouds carrying radioactive particles drifted across Europe, causing decades of havoc for hundreds of thousands of people, both near the epicentre and thousands of miles away. Due to his ongoing work documenting the effects of the nuclear disaster, Arkadiusz gained exclusive access inside the power plant

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EN_01474964_0025

An old abandoned staff area. CHERNOBYL, UKRAINE: FASCINATING images offer an incredibly rare insight into the radioactive corridors of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant. Incredible photos taken inside the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant revealed the never-ending corridors and miles of cables inside the sarcophagus ? which was built after the nuclear disaster to limit the levels of radiation that were being emitted. Further pictures showed porcelain tableware featuring the powerplant?s logo, smashed clocks, and archaic telephone switchboard inside the power plant?s administrative building which is now abandoned. In another eye opening image the airtight caissons and hot chambers - where radioactive waste is cut, shredded and sorted by radioactivity level and compressed before being incinerated - were revealed. The fascinating pictures were taken at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in Ukraine by photographer Arkadiusz Podniesi?ski (48) from Wroc?aw, Poland. Arkadiusz spent two days at the site in March 2021 and used a Nikon D850 camera to take his images. He has been documenting the effects of the Chernobyl disaster since 2008, focusing on the continual problems associated with radioactive contamination of the environment. On April 26, 1986, Chernobyl suffered the world?s worst nuclear disaster. An experiment designed to test the safety of the power plant went wrong, causing a reactor explosion and fire which spewed radiation for 10 days. Those living close to Chernobyl ? over 100,000 people ? were quickly rushed from the scene. A 20-mile exclusion zone was imposed around the damaged reactor. This was later expanded to cover more affected areas. Clouds carrying radioactive particles drifted across Europe, causing decades of havoc for hundreds of thousands of people, both near the epicentre and thousands of miles away. Due to his ongoing work documenting the effects of the nuclear disaster, Arkadiusz gained exclusive access inside the power plant which included a rare t

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EN_01474964_0026

A dosimetry check after leaving the complex. CHERNOBYL, UKRAINE: FASCINATING images offer an incredibly rare insight into the radioactive corridors of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant. Incredible photos taken inside the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant revealed the never-ending corridors and miles of cables inside the sarcophagus ? which was built after the nuclear disaster to limit the levels of radiation that were being emitted. Further pictures showed porcelain tableware featuring the powerplant?s logo, smashed clocks, and archaic telephone switchboard inside the power plant?s administrative building which is now abandoned. In another eye opening image the airtight caissons and hot chambers - where radioactive waste is cut, shredded and sorted by radioactivity level and compressed before being incinerated - were revealed. The fascinating pictures were taken at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in Ukraine by photographer Arkadiusz Podniesi?ski (48) from Wroc?aw, Poland. Arkadiusz spent two days at the site in March 2021 and used a Nikon D850 camera to take his images. He has been documenting the effects of the Chernobyl disaster since 2008, focusing on the continual problems associated with radioactive contamination of the environment. On April 26, 1986, Chernobyl suffered the world?s worst nuclear disaster. An experiment designed to test the safety of the power plant went wrong, causing a reactor explosion and fire which spewed radiation for 10 days. Those living close to Chernobyl ? over 100,000 people ? were quickly rushed from the scene. A 20-mile exclusion zone was imposed around the damaged reactor. This was later expanded to cover more affected areas. Clouds carrying radioactive particles drifted across Europe, causing decades of havoc for hundreds of thousands of people, both near the epicentre and thousands of miles away. Due to his ongoing work documenting the effects of the nuclear disaster, Arkadiusz gained exclusive access inside the power plant which i

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EN_01474052_1094

A visitor looks at a rusty machinery which was involved in the recovery works following the accident at the Chernobyl power plant, in the ghost town of Pripyat on April 24, 2021. - The 35th anniversary of the world's worst nuclear disaster will be commemorated in the ex-Soviet country on April 26, 2021. (Photo by Genya SAVILOV / AFP)

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People walk past the disused Soviet-build over-the-horizon radar (OTH) system "Duga-1" near Chernobyl on April 24, 2021. - The 35th anniversary of the world's worst nuclear disaster will be commemorated in the ex-Soviet country on April 26, 2021. (Photo by Genya SAVILOV / AFP)

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Buses with visitors wait at the Dytiatky control point to enter the Chernobyl exclusion zone on April 24, 2021. - The 35th anniversary of the world's worst nuclear disaster will be commemorated in the ex-Soviet country on April 26, 2021. (Photo by Genya SAVILOV / AFP)

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A visitor looks at a rusty tank which was involved in the recovery works following the accident at the Chernobyl power plant, in the ghost town of Pripyat on April 24, 2021. - The 35th anniversary of the world's worst nuclear disaster will be commemorated in the ex-Soviet country on April 26, 2021. (Photo by Genya SAVILOV / AFP)

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Workers walk past the covered exploded reactor inside a shelter construction at the Chernobyl nuclear plant, in Chernobyl, Ukraine, Thursday, April 15, 2021. The vast and empty Chernobyl Exclusion Zone around the site of the world???s worst nuclear accident is a baleful monument to human mistakes. Yet 35 years after a power plant reactor exploded, Ukrainians also look to it for inspiration, solace and income. (AP Photo/Efrem Lukatsky)

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An abandoned carousel in the park is seen the ghost town of Pripyat close to the Chernobyl nuclear plant, Ukraine, Thursday, April 15, 2021. The vast and empty Chernobyl Exclusion Zone around the site of the world???s worst nuclear accident is a baleful monument to human mistakes. Yet 35 years after a power plant reactor exploded, Ukrainians also look to it for inspiration, solace and income. (AP Photo/Efrem Lukatsky)

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The rusty emblem of the Soviet Union is seen over the ghost town of Pripyat close to the Chernobyl nuclear plant, Ukraine, Thursday, April 15, 2021. The vast and empty Chernobyl Exclusion Zone around the site of the world???s worst nuclear accident is a baleful monument to human mistakes. Yet 35 years after a power plant reactor exploded, Ukrainians also look to it for inspiration, solace and income. (AP Photo/Efrem Lukatsky)

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The rusty emblem of the Soviet Union is seen on the roof of an apartment building in the ghost town of Pripyat close to the Chernobyl nuclear plant, Ukraine, Thursday, April 15, 2021. The vast and empty Chernobyl Exclusion Zone around the site of the world???s worst nuclear accident is a baleful monument to human mistakes. Yet 35 years after a power plant reactor exploded, Ukrainians also look to it for inspiration, solace and income. (AP Photo/Efrem Lukatsky)

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A man walks past a shelter covering the exploded reactor at the Chernobyl nuclear plant, in Chernobyl, Ukraine, Thursday, April 15, 2021. The vast and empty Chernobyl Exclusion Zone around the site of the world???s worst nuclear accident is a baleful monument to human mistakes. Yet 35 years after a power plant reactor exploded, Ukrainians also look to it for inspiration, solace and income. (AP Photo/Efrem Lukatsky)

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A view of the ghost town of Pripyat with a shelter covering the exploded reactor at the Chernobyl nuclear plant in the background, Ukraine, Thursday, April 15, 2021. The vast and empty Chernobyl Exclusion Zone around the site of the world???s worst nuclear accident is a baleful monument to human mistakes. Yet 35 years after a power plant reactor exploded, Ukrainians also look to it for inspiration, solace and income. (AP Photo/Efrem Lukatsky)

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6525506 15.04.2021 An employee measures the level of radiation at the New Safe Confinement (NSC), built to confine the remains of the No. 4 reactor unit at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant, in Kiev region, Ukraine. Ukraine will mark the 35th anniversary of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant explosion on April 26. The explosion of reactor No. 4 of the plant in the early morning of April 26, 1986, is still regarded as the worst nuclear power disaster. Stringer / Sputnik

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6525507 15.04.2021 An abandoned hotel is pictured in the exclusion zone of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant, in Kiev region, Ukraine. Stringer / Sputnik

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6525516 15.04.2021 An abandoned amusement park is pictured in the exclusion zone of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant, in Kiev region, Ukraine. Ukraine will mark the 35th anniversary of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant explosion on April 26. The explosion of reactor No. 4 of the plant in the early morning of April 26, 1986, is still regarded as the worst nuclear power disaster. Stringer / Sputnik

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6525499 15.04.2021 An employee puts on a uniform at the New Safe Confinement (NSC), built to confine the remains of the No. 4 reactor unit at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant, in Kiev region, Ukraine. Ukraine will mark the 35th anniversary of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant explosion on April 26. The explosion of reactor No. 4 of the plant in the early morning of April 26, 1986, is still regarded as the worst nuclear power disaster. Stringer / Sputnik

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6525501 15.04.2021 Employees are seen at the New Safe Confinement (NSC), built to confine the remains of the No. 4 reactor unit at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant, in Kiev region, Ukraine. Ukraine will mark the 35th anniversary of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant explosion on April 26. The explosion of reactor No. 4 of the plant in the early morning of April 26, 1986, is still regarded as the worst nuclear power disaster. Stringer / Sputnik

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6525522 15.04.2021 An employee wearing a protective face mask works at the central control panel of the New Safe Confinement (NSC), built to confine the remains of the No. 4 reactor unit at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant, in Kiev region, Ukraine. Ukraine will mark the 35th anniversary of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant explosion on April 26. The explosion of reactor No. 4 of the plant in the early morning of April 26, 1986, is still regarded as the worst nuclear power disaster. Stringer / Sputnik

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6525524 15.04.2021 The New Safe Confinement (NSC), built to confine the remains of the No. 4 reactor unit at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant is seen, in Kiev region, Ukraine. Ukraine will mark the 35th anniversary of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant explosion on April 26. The explosion of reactor No. 4 of the plant in the early morning of April 26, 1986, is still regarded as the worst nuclear power disaster. Stringer / Sputnik

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6525532 15.04.2021 Employees are seen at the New Safe Confinement (NSC), built to confine the remains of the No. 4 reactor unit at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant, in Kiev region, Ukraine. Ukraine will mark the 35th anniversary of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant explosion on April 26. The explosion of reactor No. 4 of the plant in the early morning of April 26, 1986, is still regarded as the worst nuclear power disaster. Stringer / Sputnik

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6525493 15.04.2021 A monument to Soviet State founder Vladimir Lenin is pictured in the exclusion zone of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant, in Kiev region, Ukraine. Stringer / Sputnik

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6525486 15.04.2021 The New Safe Confinement (NSC), built to confine the remains of the No. 4 reactor unit at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant is seen, in Kiev region, Ukraine. Ukraine will mark the 35th anniversary of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant explosion on April 26. The explosion of reactor No. 4 of the plant in the early morning of April 26, 1986, is still regarded as the worst nuclear power disaster. Stringer / Sputnik

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Yevgeny Markevich, an 85-year-old former teacher, repairs a boat near his house at the Chernobyl exclusion zone, Ukraine, Wednesday, April 14, 2021. Markevich said "It's a great happiness to live at home, but it's sad that it's not as it used to be." Today, he grows potatoes and cucumbers on his garden plot, which he takes for tests "in order to partially protect myself." The vast and empty Chernobyl Exclusion Zone around the site of the world???s worst nuclear accident is a baleful monument to human mistakes. Yet 35 years after a power plant reactor exploded, Ukrainians also look to it for inspiration, solace and income. (AP Photo/Evgeniy Maloletka)

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EN_01474116_0890

Yevgeny Markevich, 85-year-old former teacher speaks to his dog as he prepares to drive at the Chernobyl exclusion zone, Ukraine, Wednesday, April 14, 2021. Markevich said "It's a great happiness to live at home, but it's sad that it's not as it used to be." Today, he grows potatoes and cucumbers on his garden plot, which he takes for tests "in order to partially protect myself." The vast and empty Chernobyl Exclusion Zone around the site of the world???s worst nuclear accident is a baleful monument to human mistakes. Yet 35 years after a power plant reactor exploded, Ukrainians also look to it for inspiration, solace and income. (AP Photo/Evgeniy Maloletka)

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EN_01474116_0900

Yevgeny Markevich, a 85-year-old former teacher, smiles smiles during his interview with the Associated Press at the Chernobyl exclusion zone, Ukraine, Wednesday, April 14, 2021. Markevich said "It's a great happiness to live at home, but it's sad that it's not as it used to be." Today, he grows potatoes and cucumbers on his garden plot, which he takes for tests "in order to partially protect myself." The vast and empty Chernobyl Exclusion Zone around the site of the world???s worst nuclear accident is a baleful monument to human mistakes. Yet 35 years after a power plant reactor exploded, Ukrainians also look to it for inspiration, solace and income. (AP Photo/Evgeniy Maloletka)

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EN_01474116_0901

Yevgeny Markevich, a 85-year-old former teacher, leaves his house at the Chernobyl exclusion zone, Ukraine, Wednesday, April 14, 2021. Markevich said "It's a great happiness to live at home, but it's sad that it's not as it used to be." Today, he grows potatoes and cucumbers on his garden plot, which he takes for tests "in order to partially protect myself." The vast and empty Chernobyl Exclusion Zone around the site of the world???s worst nuclear accident is a baleful monument to human mistakes. Yet 35 years after a power plant reactor exploded, Ukrainians also look to it for inspiration, solace and income. (AP Photo/Evgeniy Maloletka)

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An employee of an equestrian sports complex runs with a Przewalski's horse called Karamelka rescued from last year's heavy forest fire in Chernobyl, near Kiev on April 14, 2021. - Przewalski's horses, an endangered species native to Asia, surprisingly thrives in the area tainted by radiation, after having once disappeared in the wild. (Photo by Sergei SUPINSKY / AFP)

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An employee of an equestrian sports complex runs with a Przewalski's horse called Karamelka rescued from last year's heavy forest fire in Chernobyl, near Kiev on April 14, 2021. - Przewalski's horses, an endangered species native to Asia, surprisingly thrives in the area tainted by radiation, after having once disappeared in the wild. (Photo by Sergei SUPINSKY / AFP)

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EN_01473646_1125

An employee of an equestrian sports complex plays with a Przewalski's horse called Karamelka rescued from last year's heavy forest fire in Chernobyl, near Kiev on April 14, 2021. - Przewalski's horses, an endangered species native to Asia, surprisingly thrives in the area tainted by radiation, after having once disappeared in the wild. (Photo by Sergei SUPINSKY / AFP)

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Denis Vishnevskiy, chief of the unit of the Chernobyl Radiation and Ecological Biosphere Reserve, speaks during his interview with the Associated Press at the Chernobyl exclusion zone, Ukraine, Tuesday, April 13, 2021. "This is a gigantic territory in which we keep a chronicle of nature," said Denis Vishnevskiy, 43, who has been observing nature in the reserve for the past 20 years. "The exclusion zone is not a curse, but our resource." The vast and empty Chernobyl Exclusion Zone around the site of the world???s worst nuclear accident is a baleful monument to human mistakes. Yet 35 years after a power plant reactor exploded, Ukrainians also look to it for inspiration, solace and income. (AP Photo/Evgeniy Maloletka)

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EN_01474116_0887

Denis Vishnevskiy, chief of the unit of the Chernobyl Radiation and Ecological Biosphere Reserve, foreground right, and his colleagues carry a box with a beaver preparing to release it into a forest at the Chernobyl exclusion zone, Ukraine, Tuesday, April 13, 2021. To the surprise of many who expected the area might be a dead zone for centuries, wildlife is thriving: bears, bison, wolves, lynx, wild horses and dozens of bird species. According to scientists, the animals were much more resistant to radiation than expected, and were able to quickly adapt to strong radiation. (AP Photo/Evgeniy Maloletka)

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Deer are seen in a forest at the Chernobyl Radiation and Ecological Biosphere Reserve exclusion zone, Ukraine, Tuesday, April 13, 2021. The vast and empty Chernobyl Exclusion Zone around the site of the world???s worst nuclear accident is a baleful monument to human mistakes. Yet 35 years after a power plant reactor exploded, Ukrainians also look to it for inspiration, solace and income. (AP Photo/Evgeniy Maloletka)

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Abandoned country houses are seen at the Chernobyl exclusion zone, Ukraine, Tuesday, April 13, 2021. The Ukrainian authorities are calling for the exclusion zone of objects to be included in the UNESCO World Heritage List, since the object is a unique place "of interest to all mankind". The Ministry of Culture of Ukraine has already taken steps to recognize the zone as a monument, which will attract more funding and tourists. (AP Photo/Evgeniy Maloletka)

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An abandoned village house and outbuildings are seen at the Chernobyl exclusion zone, Ukraine, Tuesday, April 13, 2021. The vast and empty Chernobyl Exclusion Zone around the site of the world???s worst nuclear accident is a baleful monument to human mistakes. Yet 35 years after a power plant reactor exploded, Ukrainians also look to it for inspiration, solace and income. (AP Photo/Evgeniy Maloletka)

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Denis Vishnevskiy, chief of the unit of the Chernobyl Radiation and Ecological Biosphere Reserve looks through binoculars in the Chernobyl exclusion zone, Ukraine, Tuesday, April 13, 2021. "This is a gigantic territory in which we keep a chronicle of nature," said Denis Vishnevskiy, 43, who has been observing nature in the reserve for the past 20 years. "The exclusion zone is not a curse, but our resource ". The vast and empty Chernobyl Exclusion Zone around the site of the world???s worst nuclear accident is a baleful monument to human mistakes. Yet 35 years after a power plant reactor exploded, Ukrainians also look to it for inspiration, solace and income. (AP Photo/Evgeniy Maloletka)

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A beaver released biologist Denis Vishnevskiy is seen in a river in a forest at the Chernobyl exclusion zone, Ukraine, Tuesday, April 13, 2021. To the surprise of many who expected the area might be a dead zone for centuries, wildlife is thriving: bears, bison, wolves, lynx, wild horses and dozens of bird species. According to scientists, the animals were much more resistant to radiation than expected, and were able to quickly adapt to strong radiation. (AP Photo/Evgeniy Maloletka)

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The monument of the Soviet State founder Vladimir Lenin is seen at the Chernobyl exclusion zone, Ukraine, Tuesday, April 13, 2021. TThe vast and empty Chernobyl Exclusion Zone around the site of the world???s worst nuclear accident is a baleful monument to human mistakes. Yet 35 years after a power plant reactor exploded, Ukrainians also look to it for inspiration, solace and income. (AP Photo/Evgeniy Maloletka)

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A picture taken on April 13, 2021 shows the giant protective dome built over the sarcophagus covering the destroyed fourth reactor of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant ahead of the upcoming 35th anniversary of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster. (Photo by Sergei SUPINSKY / AFP)

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A picture taken on April 13, 2021 shows the giant protective dome built over the sarcophagus covering the destroyed fourth reactor of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant ahead of the upcoming 35th anniversary of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster. (Photo by Sergei SUPINSKY / AFP)

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A picture taken on April 13, 2021 shows the giant protective dome built over the sarcophagus covering the destroyed fourth reactor of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant ahead of the upcoming 35th anniversary of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster. (Photo by Sergei SUPINSKY / AFP)

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EN_01472946_0763

A picture taken on April 13, 2021 shows a ferris wheel in an abandoned amusement park in the ghost town of Pripyat near the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant ahead of the upcoming 35th anniversary of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster. (Photo by Sergei SUPINSKY / AFP)

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A picture taken on April 13, 2021 shows an abandoned amusement park in the ghost town of Pripyat near the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant ahead of the upcoming 35th anniversary of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster. (Photo by Sergei SUPINSKY / AFP)

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A picture taken on April 13, 2021 shows a ferris wheel in an abandoned amusement park in the ghost town of Pripyat near the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant ahead of the upcoming 35th anniversary of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster. (Photo by Sergei SUPINSKY / AFP)

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A picture taken on April 13, 2021 shows a visitor taking pictures of rusty combines in the Chernobyl zone ahead of the upcoming 35th anniversary of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster. (Photo by Sergei SUPINSKY / AFP)

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Men buy souvenirs and coffee in a souvenirs booth at the Dytyatky control point at an entrance to the Chernobyl exclusion zone on April 13, 2021, ahead of the upcoming 35th anniversary of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster. (Photo by Sergei SUPINSKY / AFP)

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Men buy souvenirs and coffee in a souvenirs booth at the Dytyatky control point at an entrance to the Chernobyl exclusion zone on April 13, 2021, ahead of the upcoming 35th anniversary of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster. (Photo by Sergei SUPINSKY / AFP)

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09 April 2021, Ukraine, Kiew: Nikolay Stepanenko (88) in his apartment. As the deputy head of the Kiev Oblast administration, he was responsible for the resettlement of the inhabitants of the towns of Prypyat, Chernobyl and another 27 villages after the Chernobyl nuclear disaster. The disability pensioner continues to live in Kiev. (to dpa "35 years of Chernobyl: Nuclear disaster burdens witnesses and politics") Photo: Andreas Stein/dpa

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EN_01473934_0069

09 April 2021, Ukraine, Kiew: Nikolay Stepanenko (88) in his apartment. As the deputy head of the Kiev Oblast administration, he was responsible for the resettlement of the inhabitants of the towns of Prypyat, Chernobyl and another 27 villages after the Chernobyl nuclear disaster. The disability pensioner continues to live in Kiev. (to dpa "35 years of Chernobyl: Nuclear disaster burdens witnesses and politics") Photo: Andreas Stein/dpa

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EN_01473934_0070

01 April 2021, Ukraine, Kiew: Ilya Suslov holds a photograph of himself in his hands. As a student in 1986, Ilya Suslov travelled from Navoiy in Uzbekistan, 3000 kilometres away, to the damaged Chernobyl nuclear power plant. From mid-August to mid-October, the then 25-year-old worked as a foreman on the construction of the first concrete sarcophagus. After the collapse of the Soviet Union, the now 60-year-old moved to Kiev in the now independent Ukraine and is now a disability pensioner. (to dpa "35 years of Chernobyl: Nuclear accident burdens witnesses and politics") Photo: Andreas Stein/dpa

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EN_01473934_0071

01 April 2021, Ukraine, Kiew: Ilya Suslov. As a student in 1986, Ilya Suslov travelled from Navoiy in Uzbekistan, 3000 kilometres away, to the damaged Chernobyl nuclear power plant. From mid-August to mid-October, the then 25-year-old worked as a foreman on the construction of the first concrete sarcophagus. After the collapse of the Soviet Union, the now 60-year-old moved to Kiev in the now independent Ukraine and is now a disability pensioner. (to dpa "35 years of Chernobyl: Nuclear accident burdens witnesses and politics") Photo: Andreas Stein/dpa

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A picture taken on April 13, 2021 shows the giant protective dome built over the sarcophagus covering the destroyed fourth reactor of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant ahead of the upcoming 35th anniversary of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster. (Photo by Sergei SUPINSKY / AFP)

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EN_01472946_0767

A picture taken on April 13, 2021 shows the giant protective dome built over the sarcophagus covering the destroyed fourth reactor of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant ahead of the upcoming 35th anniversary of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster. (Photo by Sergei SUPINSKY / AFP)

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EN_01473646_1078

A Przewalski's horse wanders near a forest road in the Chernobyl zone on April 13, 2021. - They are the Przewalski's horses, an endangered species native to Asia which surprisingly thrives in the area tainted by radiation, after having once disappeared in the wild. (Photo by Sergei SUPINSKY / AFP)

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A Przewalski's horse wanders near a forest road in the Chernobyl zone on April 13, 2021. - They are the Przewalski's horses, an endangered species native to Asia which surprisingly thrives in the area tainted by radiation, after having once disappeared in the wild. (Photo by Sergei SUPINSKY / AFP)

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EN_01473646_1081

A Przewalski's horse wanders near a forest road in the Chernobyl zone on April 13, 2021. - They are the Przewalski's horses, an endangered species native to Asia which surprisingly thrives in the area tainted by radiation, after having once disappeared in the wild. (Photo by Sergei SUPINSKY / AFP)

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EN_01473646_1082

A Przewalski's horse wanders near a forest road in the Chernobyl zone on April 13, 2021. - They are the Przewalski's horses, an endangered species native to Asia which surprisingly thrives in the area tainted by radiation, after having once disappeared in the wild. (Photo by Sergei SUPINSKY / AFP)

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Przewalski's horses wander near a forest road in the Chernobyl zone on April 13, 2021. - They are the Przewalski's horses, an endangered species native to Asia which surprisingly thrives in the area tainted by radiation, after having once disappeared in the wild. (Photo by Sergei SUPINSKY / AFP)

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EN_01473646_1087

Przewalski's horses wander near a forest road in the Chernobyl zone on April 13, 2021. - They are the Przewalski's horses, an endangered species native to Asia which surprisingly thrives in the area tainted by radiation, after having once disappeared in the wild. (Photo by Sergei SUPINSKY / AFP)

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Przewalski's horses wander near a forest road in the Chernobyl zone on April 13, 2021. - They are the Przewalski's horses, an endangered species native to Asia which surprisingly thrives in the area tainted by radiation, after having once disappeared in the wild. (Photo by Sergei SUPINSKY / AFP)

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EN_01473646_1089

Przewalski's horses wander near a forest road in the Chernobyl zone on April 13, 2021. - They are the Przewalski's horses, an endangered species native to Asia which surprisingly thrives in the area tainted by radiation, after having once disappeared in the wild. (Photo by Sergei SUPINSKY / AFP)

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EN_01473646_1090

Przewalski's horses wander near a forest road in the Chernobyl zone on April 13, 2021. - They are the Przewalski's horses, an endangered species native to Asia which surprisingly thrives in the area tainted by radiation, after having once disappeared in the wild. (Photo by Sergei SUPINSKY / AFP)