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Roberto Clemente Community Academy in the Ukrainian Village neighborhood (8)

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EN_01508608_1229

A student walks to Roberto Clemente Community Academy in the Ukrainian Village neighborhood on the first day back to school, Wednesday, Jan. 12, 2022 in Chicago. Chicago schools will offer more COVID-19 testing and have standards to close school related to infection rates, but the cost of a bitter union battle and five days of missed schools has parents and union members questioning if it was worth it. (Pat Nabong /Chicago Sun-Times via AP)

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EN_01508608_1230

A person enters Roberto Clemente Community Academy in the Ukrainian Village neighborhood on the first day back to school, Wednesday, Jan. 12, 2022 in Chicago. Chicago schools will offer more COVID-19 testing and have standards to close school related to infection rates, but the cost of a bitter union battle and five days of missed schools has parents and union members questioning if it was worth it. (Pat Nabong /Chicago Sun-Times via AP)

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EN_01508608_1231

Joshua Lopez, a senior at Roberto Clemente Community Academy in the Ukrainian Village neighborhood, enters the school on the first day back to school, Wednesday, Jan. 12, 2022 in Chicago. Chicago schools will offer more COVID-19 testing and have standards to close school related to infection rates, but the cost of a bitter union battle and five days of missed schools has parents and union members questioning if it was worth it. (Pat Nabong /Chicago Sun-Times via AP)

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EN_01508608_1232

Students walk outside Roberto Clemente Community Academy in the Ukrainian Village neighborhood on the first day back to school, Wednesday, Jan. 12, 2022 in Chicago. Chicago schools will offer more COVID-19 testing and have standards to close school related to infection rates, but the cost of a bitter union battle and five days of missed schools has parents and union members questioning if it was worth it. (Pat Nabong /Chicago Sun-Times via AP)

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EN_01508608_1233

A student wearing a mask sits in the lobby of Roberto Clemente Community Academy in the Ukrainian Village neighborhood on the first day back to school, Wednesday, Jan. 12, 2022 in Chicago. Chicago schools will offer more COVID-19 testing and have standards to close school related to infection rates, but the cost of a bitter union battle and five days of missed schools has parents and union members questioning if it was worth it. (Pat Nabong /Chicago Sun-Times via AP)

EN_01508608_1234
EN_01508608_1234

A student walks outside Roberto Clemente Community Academy in the Ukrainian Village neighborhood on the first day back to school, Wednesday, Jan. 12, 2022 in Chicago. Chicago schools will offer more COVID-19 testing and have standards to close school related to infection rates, but the cost of a bitter union battle and five days of missed schools has parents and union members questioning if it was worth it. (Pat Nabong /Chicago Sun-Times via AP)

EN_01508608_1235
EN_01508608_1235

Students wearing masks fill the lobby of Roberto Clemente Community Academy in the Ukrainian Village neighborhood on the first day back to school, Wednesday, Jan. 12, 2022 in Chicago. Chicago schools will offer more COVID-19 testing and have standards to close school related to infection rates, but the cost of a bitter union battle and five days of missed schools has parents and union members questioning if it was worth it. (Pat Nabong /Chicago Sun-Times via AP)

EN_01508608_1236
EN_01508608_1236

Students fill the lobby outside Roberto Clemente Community Academy in the Ukrainian Village neighborhood on the first day back to school, Wednesday, Jan. 12, 2022 in Chicago. Chicago schools will offer more COVID-19 testing and have standards to close school related to infection rates, but the cost of a bitter union battle and five days of missed schools has parents and union members questioning if it was worth it. (Pat Nabong /Chicago Sun-Times via AP)