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Ukraine Harvest Starts But Silos Are Full (24)

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A combine harvester collects grain crops in a field in Odesa Region, southern Ukraine, June 22, 2022. From a dramatic loss of export revenue to mine-riddled fields and exploding machinery, Russia’s invasion has taken a massive toll on Ukraine’s agriculture sector. Now, with ports remaining closed despite international efforts to reach a deal, harvests are getting underway with silos still loaded with last year’s crops. Farmers are searching for alternatives to store the growing stockpiles while already worrying about how much they’ll be able to plant for the 2023 season. Photo by Nina Lyashonok/Ukrinform/ABACAPRESS.COM

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EN_01529058_0002

A combine harvester collects grain crops in a field in Odesa Region, southern Ukraine, June 22, 2022. From a dramatic loss of export revenue to mine-riddled fields and exploding machinery, Russia’s invasion has taken a massive toll on Ukraine’s agriculture sector. Now, with ports remaining closed despite international efforts to reach a deal, harvests are getting underway with silos still loaded with last year’s crops. Farmers are searching for alternatives to store the growing stockpiles while already worrying about how much they’ll be able to plant for the 2023 season. Photo by Nina Lyashonok/Ukrinform/ABACAPRESS.COM

EN_01529058_0003
EN_01529058_0003

A combine harvester collects grain crops in a field in Odesa Region, southern Ukraine, June 22, 2022. From a dramatic loss of export revenue to mine-riddled fields and exploding machinery, Russia’s invasion has taken a massive toll on Ukraine’s agriculture sector. Now, with ports remaining closed despite international efforts to reach a deal, harvests are getting underway with silos still loaded with last year’s crops. Farmers are searching for alternatives to store the growing stockpiles while already worrying about how much they’ll be able to plant for the 2023 season. Photo by Nina Lyashonok/Ukrinform/ABACAPRESS.COM

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A combine harvester collects grain crops in a field in Odesa Region, southern Ukraine, June 22, 2022. From a dramatic loss of export revenue to mine-riddled fields and exploding machinery, Russia’s invasion has taken a massive toll on Ukraine’s agriculture sector. Now, with ports remaining closed despite international efforts to reach a deal, harvests are getting underway with silos still loaded with last year’s crops. Farmers are searching for alternatives to store the growing stockpiles while already worrying about how much they’ll be able to plant for the 2023 season. Photo by Nina Lyashonok/Ukrinform/ABACAPRESS.COM

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EN_01529058_0005

A combine harvester collects grain crops in a field in Odesa Region, southern Ukraine, June 22, 2022. From a dramatic loss of export revenue to mine-riddled fields and exploding machinery, Russia’s invasion has taken a massive toll on Ukraine’s agriculture sector. Now, with ports remaining closed despite international efforts to reach a deal, harvests are getting underway with silos still loaded with last year’s crops. Farmers are searching for alternatives to store the growing stockpiles while already worrying about how much they’ll be able to plant for the 2023 season. Photo by Nina Lyashonok/Ukrinform/ABACAPRESS.COM

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EN_01529058_0006

A combine harvester collects grain crops in a field in Odesa Region, southern Ukraine, June 22, 2022. From a dramatic loss of export revenue to mine-riddled fields and exploding machinery, Russia’s invasion has taken a massive toll on Ukraine’s agriculture sector. Now, with ports remaining closed despite international efforts to reach a deal, harvests are getting underway with silos still loaded with last year’s crops. Farmers are searching for alternatives to store the growing stockpiles while already worrying about how much they’ll be able to plant for the 2023 season. Photo by Nina Lyashonok/Ukrinform/ABACAPRESS.COM

EN_01529058_0007
EN_01529058_0007

A combine harvester collects grain crops in a field in Odesa Region, southern Ukraine, June 22, 2022. From a dramatic loss of export revenue to mine-riddled fields and exploding machinery, Russia’s invasion has taken a massive toll on Ukraine’s agriculture sector. Now, with ports remaining closed despite international efforts to reach a deal, harvests are getting underway with silos still loaded with last year’s crops. Farmers are searching for alternatives to store the growing stockpiles while already worrying about how much they’ll be able to plant for the 2023 season. Photo by Nina Lyashonok/Ukrinform/ABACAPRESS.COM

EN_01529058_0008
EN_01529058_0008

A combine harvester collects grain crops in a field in Odesa Region, southern Ukraine, June 22, 2022. From a dramatic loss of export revenue to mine-riddled fields and exploding machinery, Russia’s invasion has taken a massive toll on Ukraine’s agriculture sector. Now, with ports remaining closed despite international efforts to reach a deal, harvests are getting underway with silos still loaded with last year’s crops. Farmers are searching for alternatives to store the growing stockpiles while already worrying about how much they’ll be able to plant for the 2023 season. Photo by Nina Lyashonok/Ukrinform/ABACAPRESS.COM

EN_01529058_0009
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A combine harvester collects grain crops in a field in Odesa Region, southern Ukraine, June 22, 2022. From a dramatic loss of export revenue to mine-riddled fields and exploding machinery, Russia’s invasion has taken a massive toll on Ukraine’s agriculture sector. Now, with ports remaining closed despite international efforts to reach a deal, harvests are getting underway with silos still loaded with last year’s crops. Farmers are searching for alternatives to store the growing stockpiles while already worrying about how much they’ll be able to plant for the 2023 season. Photo by Nina Lyashonok/Ukrinform/ABACAPRESS.COM

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A combine harvester collects grain crops in a field in Odesa Region, southern Ukraine, June 22, 2022. From a dramatic loss of export revenue to mine-riddled fields and exploding machinery, Russia’s invasion has taken a massive toll on Ukraine’s agriculture sector. Now, with ports remaining closed despite international efforts to reach a deal, harvests are getting underway with silos still loaded with last year’s crops. Farmers are searching for alternatives to store the growing stockpiles while already worrying about how much they’ll be able to plant for the 2023 season. Photo by Nina Lyashonok/Ukrinform/ABACAPRESS.COM

EN_01529058_0011
EN_01529058_0011

A combine harvester collects grain crops in a field in Odesa Region, southern Ukraine, June 22, 2022. From a dramatic loss of export revenue to mine-riddled fields and exploding machinery, Russia’s invasion has taken a massive toll on Ukraine’s agriculture sector. Now, with ports remaining closed despite international efforts to reach a deal, harvests are getting underway with silos still loaded with last year’s crops. Farmers are searching for alternatives to store the growing stockpiles while already worrying about how much they’ll be able to plant for the 2023 season. Photo by Nina Lyashonok/Ukrinform/ABACAPRESS.COM

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A tractor is seen in a field during the harvesting of grain crops in Odesa Region, southern Ukraine, June 22, 2022. From a dramatic loss of export revenue to mine-riddled fields and exploding machinery, Russia’s invasion has taken a massive toll on Ukraine’s agriculture sector. Now, with ports remaining closed despite international efforts to reach a deal, harvests are getting underway with silos still loaded with last year’s crops. Farmers are searching for alternatives to store the growing stockpiles while already worrying about how much they’ll be able to plant for the 2023 season. Photo by Nina Lyashonok/Ukrinform/ABACAPRESS.COM

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A bucket loader piles up grain at a warehouse in Odesa Region, southern Ukraine, June 22, 2022. From a dramatic loss of export revenue to mine-riddled fields and exploding machinery, Russia’s invasion has taken a massive toll on Ukraine’s agriculture sector. Now, with ports remaining closed despite international efforts to reach a deal, harvests are getting underway with silos still loaded with last year’s crops. Farmers are searching for alternatives to store the growing stockpiles while already worrying about how much they’ll be able to plant for the 2023 season. Photo by Nina Lyashonok/Ukrinform/ABACAPRESS.COM

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A grain truck goes up a ramp, Odesa Region, southern Ukraine, June 22, 2022. From a dramatic loss of export revenue to mine-riddled fields and exploding machinery, Russia’s invasion has taken a massive toll on Ukraine’s agriculture sector. Now, with ports remaining closed despite international efforts to reach a deal, harvests are getting underway with silos still loaded with last year’s crops. Farmers are searching for alternatives to store the growing stockpiles while already worrying about how much they’ll be able to plant for the 2023 season. Photo by Nina Lyashonok/Ukrinform/ABACAPRESS.COM

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A grain truck is pictured at a facility in Odesa Region, southern Ukraine, June 22, 2022. From a dramatic loss of export revenue to mine-riddled fields and exploding machinery, Russia’s invasion has taken a massive toll on Ukraine’s agriculture sector. Now, with ports remaining closed despite international efforts to reach a deal, harvests are getting underway with silos still loaded with last year’s crops. Farmers are searching for alternatives to store the growing stockpiles while already worrying about how much they’ll be able to plant for the 2023 season. Photo by Nina Lyashonok/Ukrinform/ABACAPRESS.COM

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A man holds the grain in two palms, Odesa Region, southern Ukraine, June 22, 2022. From a dramatic loss of export revenue to mine-riddled fields and exploding machinery, Russia’s invasion has taken a massive toll on Ukraine’s agriculture sector. Now, with ports remaining closed despite international efforts to reach a deal, harvests are getting underway with silos still loaded with last year’s crops. Farmers are searching for alternatives to store the growing stockpiles while already worrying about how much they’ll be able to plant for the 2023 season. Photo by Nina Lyashonok/Ukrinform/ABACAPRESS.COM

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A train due to transport grain crops is pictured in Odesa Region, southern Ukraine, June 22, 2022. From a dramatic loss of export revenue to mine-riddled fields and exploding machinery, Russia’s invasion has taken a massive toll on Ukraine’s agriculture sector. Now, with ports remaining closed despite international efforts to reach a deal, harvests are getting underway with silos still loaded with last year’s crops. Farmers are searching for alternatives to store the growing stockpiles while already worrying about how much they’ll be able to plant for the 2023 season. Photo by Nina Lyashonok/Ukrinform/ABACAPRESS.COM

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Grain is being loaded into a hopper car, Odesa Region, southern Ukraine, June 22, 2022. From a dramatic loss of export revenue to mine-riddled fields and exploding machinery, Russia’s invasion has taken a massive toll on Ukraine’s agriculture sector. Now, with ports remaining closed despite international efforts to reach a deal, harvests are getting underway with silos still loaded with last year’s crops. Farmers are searching for alternatives to store the growing stockpiles while already worrying about how much they’ll be able to plant for the 2023 season. Photo by Nina Lyashonok/Ukrinform/ABACAPRESS.COM

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Grain is stored at a facility in Odesa Region, southern Ukraine, June 22, 2022. From a dramatic loss of export revenue to mine-riddled fields and exploding machinery, Russia’s invasion has taken a massive toll on Ukraine’s agriculture sector. Now, with ports remaining closed despite international efforts to reach a deal, harvests are getting underway with silos still loaded with last year’s crops. Farmers are searching for alternatives to store the growing stockpiles while already worrying about how much they’ll be able to plant for the 2023 season. Photo by Nina Lyashonok/Ukrinform/ABACAPRESS.COM

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Grain is stored at a facility in Odesa Region, southern Ukraine, June 22, 2022. From a dramatic loss of export revenue to mine-riddled fields and exploding machinery, Russia’s invasion has taken a massive toll on Ukraine’s agriculture sector. Now, with ports remaining closed despite international efforts to reach a deal, harvests are getting underway with silos still loaded with last year’s crops. Farmers are searching for alternatives to store the growing stockpiles while already worrying about how much they’ll be able to plant for the 2023 season. Photo by Nina Lyashonok/Ukrinform/ABACAPRESS.COM

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Grain is stored at a facility in Odesa Region, southern Ukraine, June 22, 2022. From a dramatic loss of export revenue to mine-riddled fields and exploding machinery, Russia’s invasion has taken a massive toll on Ukraine’s agriculture sector. Now, with ports remaining closed despite international efforts to reach a deal, harvests are getting underway with silos still loaded with last year’s crops. Farmers are searching for alternatives to store the growing stockpiles while already worrying about how much they’ll be able to plant for the 2023 season. Photo by Nina Lyashonok/Ukrinform/ABACAPRESS.COM

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Grain silos are pictured in Odesa Region, southern Ukraine, June 22, 2022. From a dramatic loss of export revenue to mine-riddled fields and exploding machinery, Russia’s invasion has taken a massive toll on Ukraine’s agriculture sector. Now, with ports remaining closed despite international efforts to reach a deal, harvests are getting underway with silos still loaded with last year’s crops. Farmers are searching for alternatives to store the growing stockpiles while already worrying about how much they’ll be able to plant for the 2023 season. Photo by Nina Lyashonok/Ukrinform/ABACAPRESS.COM

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Silos are pictured at a facility in Odesa Region, southern Ukraine, June 22, 2022. From a dramatic loss of export revenue to mine-riddled fields and exploding machinery, Russia’s invasion has taken a massive toll on Ukraine’s agriculture sector. Now, with ports remaining closed despite international efforts to reach a deal, harvests are getting underway with silos still loaded with last year’s crops. Farmers are searching for alternatives to store the growing stockpiles while already worrying about how much they’ll be able to plant for the 2023 season. Photo by Nina Lyashonok/Ukrinform/ABACAPRESS.COM

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Workers stand by a grain truck at a facility in Odesa Region, southern Ukraine, June 22, 2022. From a dramatic loss of export revenue to mine-riddled fields and exploding machinery, Russia’s invasion has taken a massive toll on Ukraine’s agriculture sector. Now, with ports remaining closed despite international efforts to reach a deal, harvests are getting underway with silos still loaded with last year’s crops. Farmers are searching for alternatives to store the growing stockpiles while already worrying about how much they’ll be able to plant for the 2023 season. Photo by Nina Lyashonok/Ukrinform/ABACAPRESS.COM