закрити [x]
приховати бюлетень | кошик

Біологія (бактерії, віруси) (438)

1234... з 22 next last

Зображення

EN_01200023_0001
EN_01200023_0001

Coloured transmission electron micrograph (TEM) of Zika virus particles (yellow). Zika is an RNA (ribonucleic acid) virus from the Flaviviridae family. It is transmitted to humans via the bite of an infected Aedes sp. mosquito. It causes zika fever, a mild disease with symptoms including rash, joint pain and conjunctivitis. In 2015 a previously unknown connection between Zika infection in pregnant women and microcephaly (small head) in newborns was reported. This can cause miscarriage or death soon after birth, or lead to developmental delays and disorders. Magnification: x160,000 when printed at 10 centimetres wide.

EN_01200023_0002
EN_01200023_0002

Coloured transmission electron micrograph (TEM) of Zika virus particles (dark red). Zika is an RNA (ribonucleic acid) virus from the Flaviviridae family. It is transmitted to humans via the bite of an infected Aedes sp. mosquito. It causes zika fever, a mild disease with symptoms including rash, joint pain and conjunctivitis. In 2015 a previously unknown connection between Zika infection in pregnant women and microcephaly (small head) in newborns was reported. This can cause miscarriage or death soon after birth, or lead to developmental delays and disorders. Magnification: x160,000 when printed at 10 centimetres wide.

EN_01200023_0003
EN_01200023_0003

Coloured transmission electron micrograph (TEM) of Zika virus particles (blue). Zika is an RNA (ribonucleic acid) virus from the Flaviviridae family. It is transmitted to humans via the bite of an infected Aedes sp. mosquito. It causes zika fever, a mild disease with symptoms including rash, joint pain and conjunctivitis. In 2015 a previously unknown connection between Zika infection in pregnant women and microcephaly (small head) in newborns was reported. This can cause miscarriage or death soon after birth, or lead to developmental delays and disorders. Magnification: x160,000 when printed at 10 centimetres wide.

EN_01151355_0046
rmEN_01151355_0046

Bacteriophage. Artwork of an enterohacteria phage T4 particle. A bacteriophage, or phage, is a virus that infects bacteria (in background). Enterobacteria T4 infects Escherichia coli bacteria. It consists of an icosahedral (20-sided) head , which contains the genetic material (helical strands), a tail (cylinder) and tail fibres (leg-like). The tail fibres attach to the surface of a bacterium and then the tail injects the genetic material into the cell. The viral genetic material hijacks the bacterium's own cellular machinery, forcing it to produce more copies of the bacteriophage. When a sufficient number have been produced, the phages exit the cell by lysis, killing it in the process.

EN_01151355_0133
rmEN_01151355_0133

Influenza (flu) virus entering a cell, artwork. Embedded in the virus particle's lipid envelope (green) are two types of protein spike, haemagglutinin (H) and neuraminidase (N). These are used to recognise and bind to a host cell and also determine the strain of virus. Once in the host cell the virus hijacks the cell's machinery making it produce new copies of the virus.

EN_01151355_0192
rmEN_01151355_0192

Computer artwork of ebola virus particles. Seen on the viral surface are trimeric transmembrane glycoproteins (pink) that facilitate the virus' entry into a host cell. This virus is the cause of ebola virus disease in humans and nonhuman primates. It is a severe and often fatal disease with symptoms including fever, fatigue, muscle aches, vomiting, diarrhoea and haemorrhaging (internal bleeding). There is no cure for the disease, but three quarters of patients can recover if provided with sufficient medical support.

EN_01151355_0273
rmEN_01151355_0273

Computer artwork of ebola virus particles. Seen on the viral surface are trimeric transmembrane glycoproteins (green) that facilitate the virus' entry into a host cell. This virus is the cause of ebola virus disease in humans and nonhuman primates. It is a severe and often fatal disease with symptoms including fever, fatigue, muscle aches, vomiting, diarrhoea and haemorrhaging (internal bleeding). There is no cure for the disease, but three quarters of patients can recover if provided with sufficient medical support.

EN_01151355_0347
rmEN_01151355_0347

Immune response to bacteria, artwork. Invading bacteria (yellow) are phagocytosed (engulfed) by macrophages, a type of white blood cell. Fragments of protein (antigen) from the bacteria are displayed on the macrophage's surface. The antigen is recognised by helper T lymphocytes, which secrete chemicals such as cytokines (pink dots) to activate other immune cells, including B lymphocytes. The B lymphocytes differentiate into plasma cells, which produce large numbers of antibodies (orange) that recognise the antigen. The antibodies either neutralise the pathogen or flag it for destruction by other cells.

EN_01151355_0349
rmEN_01151355_0349

Ebola virus particles, computer artwork. This virus has a central core containing single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) with a surrounding matrix protein layer. On the viral surface are trimeric transmembrane glycoproteins (pink) that facilitate the entry of the virus into a host cell (across bottom). This virus is the cause of ebola virus disease in humans and nonhuman primates. It is a severe and often fatal disease with symptoms including fever, fatigue, muscle aches, vomiting, diarrhoea and haemorrhaging (internal bleeding). There is no cure, but around three-quarters of patients can recover if provided with sufficient medical support.

EN_01151355_0350
rmEN_01151355_0350

Ebola virus particles, computer artwork. This virus has a central core containing single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) with a surrounding matrix protein layer. On the viral surface are trimeric transmembrane glycoproteins (pink) that facilitate the entry of the virus into a host cell (across bottom). This virus is the cause of ebola virus disease in humans and nonhuman primates. It is a severe and often fatal disease with symptoms including fever, fatigue, muscle aches, vomiting, diarrhoea and haemorrhaging (internal bleeding). There is no cure, but around three-quarters of patients can recover if provided with sufficient medical support.

EN_01151355_1693
rmEN_01151355_1693

European ebola epidemic, conceptual computer artwork. Ebola virus (red and blue) is the cause of ebola virus disease in humans and nonhuman primates. It is a severe and often fatal disease with symptoms including fever, fatigue, muscle aches, vomiting, diarrhoea and haemorrhaging (internal bleeding). There is no cure for the disease, but three quarters of patients can recover if provided with sufficient medical support.

EN_01151355_2000
rmEN_01151355_2000

Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (blue), artwork. T lymphocytes are a type of white blood cell and one of the components of the body's immune system. They recognise a specific site (antigen) on the surface of cells or pathogens and bind to it. Some T lymphocytes then signal for other immune system cells to eliminate the cell. Cytotoxic T lymphocytes eliminate the cell themselves by releasing a protein that forms pores in the cell's membrane.

EN_01151355_0274
rmEN_01151355_0274

Computer artwork of ebola virus particles. Seen on the viral surface are trimeric transmembrane glycoproteins (pink) that facilitate the virus' entry into a host cell. This virus is the cause of ebola virus disease in humans and nonhuman primates. It is a severe and often fatal disease with symptoms including fever, fatigue, muscle aches, vomiting, diarrhoea and haemorrhaging (internal bleeding). There is no cure for the disease, but three quarters of patients can recover if provided with sufficient medical support.

EN_01151355_0275
rmEN_01151355_0275

Computer artwork of ebola virus particles. Seen on the viral surface are trimeric transmembrane glycoproteins (pink) that facilitate the virus' entry into a host cell. This virus is the cause of ebola virus disease in humans and nonhuman primates. It is a severe and often fatal disease with symptoms including fever, fatigue, muscle aches, vomiting, diarrhoea and haemorrhaging (internal bleeding). There is no cure for the disease, but three quarters of patients can recover if provided with sufficient medical support.

EN_01151355_2013
rmEN_01151355_2013

Computer artwork of ebola virus particles. Seen on the viral surface are trimeric transmembrane glycoproteins (pink) that facilitate the virus' entry into a host cell. This virus is the cause of ebola virus disease in humans and nonhuman primates. It is a severe and often fatal disease with symptoms including fever, fatigue, muscle aches, vomiting, diarrhoea and haemorrhaging (internal bleeding). There is no cure for the disease, but three quarters of patients can recover if provided with sufficient medical support.

EN_00966014_0001
rmEN_00966014_0001

Avian influenza virus (H5N1) infection process. The virus enters the cell by endocytosis (top left). The endosome (yellow) moves to the cell nucleus and releases viral genetic information via disassembled nucleocapsid RNA and ribonucleoproteins (vRNP's). The host cell nucleus then directs the synthesizing of new viral components, which assemble and bud off.

EN_00966278_1449
rmEN_00966278_1449

Dark field photomicrograph of Volvox aureus, a colonial green alga, with gonidia (daughter colonies), mag. 35x (at 24 x 36 mm). Individual flagellated cells of this chlorophyte form a coordinated spherical colony. Larger eyespots on anterior cells enable the colony to swim towards the light. Posterior cells are specialized for asexual reproduction.

EN_00966278_2764
rmEN_00966278_2764

Illustration of various of biomarkers. These include mitochondrial DNA, bloodborne viral particles, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP's, or snips), nuclear debris from apoptotic cells, tyrosine kinase receptors, and other metabolic pathway proteins. They are used to track down cancers and identify processes vulnerable to therapeutic intervention.

EN_00966278_2850
rmEN_00966278_2850

Illustration of an avian influenza A virus (H5N1) virion, cutaway view. Shown from outside to center: hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) glycoprotein spikes embedded in the lipid bilayer membrane envelope; matrix protein shell; and core, including the helical nucleocapsids (RNA plus NP nucleoproteins) and 3-protein polymerases (sphere triplets).

EN_00966278_4241
rmEN_00966278_4241

Artist's concept of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) pathway within a cell. The pathway is labeled.

вгору

1234... з 22 next last