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Nobel Prize laureates 2021 (870)

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Permanent Secretary of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences Goran K Hansson, center, announces the 2021 Nobel prize for economics, flanked by members of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences Peter Fredriksson, left, and Eva Mork, during a press conference at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, in Stockholm, Sweden, Monday, Oct. 11, 2021. From left on the screen above are the winners David Card of the University of California at Berkeley; Joshua Angrist from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology; and Guido Imbens from Stanford University. (Claudio Bresciani/TT via AP)

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From left, on the screen are the winners of the 2021 Nobel prize for economics; David Card of the University of California at Berkeley; Joshua Angrist from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology; and Guido Imbens from Stanford University, announced during a press conference at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, in Stockholm, Sweden, Monday, Oct. 11, 2021. (Claudio Bresciani/TT via AP)

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Permanent Secretary of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences Goran K Hansson, center, announces the 2021 Nobel prize for economics, flanked by members of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences Peter Fredriksson, left, and Eva Mork, during a press conference at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, in Stockholm, Sweden, Monday, Oct. 11, 2021. From left on the screen above are the winners David Card of the University of California at Berkeley; Joshua Angrist from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology; and Guido Imbens from Stanford University. (Claudio Bresciani/TT via AP)

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Winner of the Nobel prize for economics Joshua Angrist holds his granddaughter Bella (no last name or age given) at his home Monday, Oct. 11, 2021, in Brookline, Mass. Angrist, of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, shared the prize with David Card of the University of California at Berkeley and Guido Imbens from Stanford University. Angrist and Imbens won for their work on methods that allow economists to draw conclusions about cause and effect where studies cannot be carried out according to strict scientific methods. (AP Photo/Josh Reynolds)

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Winner of the Nobel prize for economics Joshua Angrist speaks to a reporter with his granddaughter Bella, and wife Mira Angrist, a professor of Hebrew at Boston University, from his home Monday, Oct. 11, 2021, in Brookline, Mass. Angrist, a professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, shared the prize with David Card of the University of California at Berkeley and Guido Imbens from Stanford University. Angrist and Imbens won for their work on methods that allow economists to draw conclusions about cause and effect where studies cannot be carried out according to strict scientific methods. (AP Photo/Josh Reynolds)

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Winner of the Nobel prize for economics Joshua Angrist arrives at his home Monday, Oct. 11, 2021, in Brookline, Mass. Angrist, of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, shared the prize with David Card of the University of California at Berkeley and Guido Imbens from Stanford University. Angrist and Imbens won for their work on methods that allow economists to draw conclusions about cause and effect where studies cannot be carried out according to strict scientific methods. (AP Photo/Josh Reynolds)

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Winner of the Nobel prize for economics Joshua Angrist speaks to reporters at his home Monday, Oct. 11, 2021, in Brookline, Mass. Angrist, of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, shared the prize with David Card of the University of California at Berkeley and Guido Imbens from Stanford University. Angrist and Imbens won for their work on methods that allow economists to draw conclusions about cause and effect where studies cannot be carried out according to strict scientific methods. (AP Photo/Josh Reynolds)

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From left, Winner of the Nobel prize for economics Joshua Angrist speaks to a reporter with his granddaughter Bella, and Wife Mira Angrist a professor of Hebrew at Boston University from his home Monday, Oct. 11, 2021, in Brookline, Mass. Angrist, a professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, shared the prize with David Card of the University of California at Berkeley and Guido Imbens from Stanford University. Angrist and Imbens won for their work on methods that allow economists to draw conclusions about cause and effect where studies cannot be carried out according to strict scientific methods. (AP Photo/Josh Reynolds)

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From left, Winner of the Nobel prize for economics Joshua Angrist speaks to a reporter with his granddaughter Bella, and Wife Mira Angrist a professor of Hebrew at Boston University from his home Monday, Oct. 11, 2021, in Brookline, Mass. Angrist, a professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, shared the prize with David Card of the University of California at Berkeley and Guido Imbens from Stanford University. Angrist and Imbens won for their work on methods that allow economists to draw conclusions about cause and effect where studies cannot be carried out according to strict scientific methods. (AP Photo/Josh Reynolds)

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In this still image from a video news conference, Joshua Angrist, one of the winners of the 2021 Nobel Prize in Economics, is joined by his granddaughter Bella, Monday, Oct. 11, 2021. Angrist, of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and Guido Imbens from Stanford University share the prize with David Card of the University of California, Berkeley. (Massachusetts Institute of Technology via AP)

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David Card, winner of the 2021 Nobel Prize in economics, stands for a portrait in Berkeley, Calif., on Monday, Oct. 11, 2021. Card, a professor at the University of California, Berkeley, received the award for his research on minimum wages and immigration. (AP Photo/Noah Berger)

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David Card, winner of the 2021 Nobel Prize in economics, stands for a portrait in Berkeley, Calif., on Monday, Oct. 11, 2021. Card, a professor at the University of California, Berkeley, received the award for his research on minimum wages and immigration. (AP Photo/Noah Berger)

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David Card, winner of the 2021 Nobel Prize in economics, sits in his office in Berkeley, Calif., on Monday, Oct. 11, 2021. Card, a professor at the University of California, Berkeley, received the award for his research on minimum wages and immigration. (AP Photo/Noah Berger)

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David Card, winner of the 2021 Nobel Prize in economics, sits in his office in Berkeley, Calif., on Monday, Oct. 11, 2021. Card, a professor at the University of California, Berkeley, received the award for his research on minimum wages and immigration. (AP Photo/Noah Berger)

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David Card, winner of the 2021 Nobel Prize in economics, walks through University of California, Berkeley campus in Berkeley, Calif., on Monday, Oct. 11, 2021. Card received the award for his research on minimum wages and immigration. (AP Photo/Noah Berger)

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Goran K. Hansson (C), Permanent Secretary of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, and Nobel Economics Prize committee members Peter Fredriksson (L) and Eva Mork (R) give a press conference to announce the winners of the 2021 Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in Stockholm, on October 11, 2021. - Canadian David Card, Israeli-American Joshua Angrist and Dutch-American Guido Imbens won the Nobel Economics Prize for insights into the labour market and "natural experiments", the jury said. (Photo by Claudio BRESCIANI / TT NEWS AGENCY / AFP) / Sweden OUT

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Goran K. Hansson (C), Permanent Secretary of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, and Nobel Economics Prize committee members Peter Fredriksson (L) and Eva Mork (R) give a press conference to announce the winners of the 2021 Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in Stockholm, on October 11, 2021. - Canadian David Card, Israeli-American Joshua Angrist and Dutch-American Guido Imbens won the Nobel Economics Prize for insights into the labour market and "natural experiments", the jury said. (Photo by Claudio BRESCIANI / TT NEWS AGENCY / AFP) / Sweden OUT

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The winners of the 2021 Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel (L-R) David Card from the University of California, Berkeley, USA, Joshua D. Angrist from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, USA and Guido W. Imbens from the Stanford University, USA, are seen on a screen during a press conference at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in Stockholm, Sweden, on October 11, 2021. - Canadian David Card, Israeli-American Joshua Angrist and Dutch-American Guido Imbens won the Nobel Economics Prize for insights into the labour market and "natural experiments", the jury said. (Photo by Claudio BRESCIANI / TT NEWS AGENCY / AFP) / Sweden OUT

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Eva Mork, member of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, explains research field of the winners of the 2021 Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel, during a press conference at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in Stockholm, Sweden, on October 11, 2021. - Canadian David Card, Israeli-American Joshua Angrist and Dutch-American Guido Imbens won the Nobel Economics Prize for insights into the labour market and "natural experiments", the jury said. (Photo by Claudio BRESCIANI / TT NEWS AGENCY / AFP) / Sweden OUT

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In this photo received by AFP on October 11, 2021 by the Stanford Graduate School of Business, Professor Guido W. Imbens looks on in Standford, California. - Three US-based academics won the Nobel Economics Prize for research that "revolutionised" empirical work in their field and brought better understanding of how labour markets work, the jury said. Canadian David Card, Israeli-American Joshua Angrist and Dutch-American Guido Imbens shared the prize for providing "new insights about the labour market" and showing "what conclusions about cause and effect can be drawn from natural experiments," the Nobel committee said in a statement. (Photo by Handout / AFP) / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO /Stanford Graduate School of Business/ HO " - NO MARKETING - NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS

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In this photo received by AFP on October 11, 2021 by the MIT Department of Economics, Ford International Professor of Economics Joshua Angrist poses for a photo in Cambridge, Massachusets. - Three US-based academics won the Nobel Economics Prize for research that "revolutionised" empirical work in their field and brought better understanding of how labour markets work, the jury said. Canadian David Card, Israeli-American Joshua Angrist and Dutch-American Guido Imbens shared the prize for providing "new insights about the labour market" and showing "what conclusions about cause and effect can be drawn from natural experiments," the Nobel committee said in a statement. (Photo by Handout / MIT Department of Economics / AFP) / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO /MIT Department of Economics / HO " - NO MARKETING - NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS

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In this photo received by AFP on October 11, 2021 by the Stanford Graduate School of Business, Professor Guido W. Imbens poses for a photo in Standford, California. - Three US-based academics won the Nobel Economics Prize for research that "revolutionised" empirical work in their field and brought better understanding of how labour markets work, the jury said. Canadian David Card, Israeli-American Joshua Angrist and Dutch-American Guido Imbens shared the prize for providing "new insights about the labour market" and showing "what conclusions about cause and effect can be drawn from natural experiments," the Nobel committee said in a statement. (Photo by Andrew Brodhead / AFP) / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO /Stanford Graduate School of Business/ Andrew BRODHEAD" - NO MARKETING - NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS

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In this photo received by AFP on October 11, 2021 by the University of California Berkeley, Professor David Card is seen. - Three US-based academics won the Nobel Economics Prize for research that "revolutionised" empirical work in their field and brought better understanding of how labour markets work, the jury said. Canadian David Card, Israeli-American Joshua Angrist and Dutch-American Guido Imbens shared the prize for providing "new insights about the labour market" and showing "what conclusions about cause and effect can be drawn from natural experiments," the Nobel committee said in a statement. (Photo by Handout / AFP) / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO /University of California Berkeley/ HO" - NO MARKETING - NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS

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(COMBO) This combination of pictures created on October 11, 2021 shows Photos received by AFP on October 11, 2021 by the Stanford Graduate School of Business, Professor Guido W. Imbens poses for a photo in Standford, California. In this photo received by AFP on October 11, 2021 by the MIT Department of Economics, Ford International Professor of Economics Joshua Angrist poses for a photo in Cambridge, Massachusets. In this photo received by AFP on October 11, 2021 by the University of California Berkeley, Professor David Card is seen. - Three US-based academics won the Nobel Economics Prize for research that "revolutionised" empirical work in their field and brought better understanding of how labour markets work, the jury said. Canadian David Card, Israeli-American Joshua Angrist and Dutch-American Guido Imbens shared the prize for providing "new insights about the labour market" and showing "what conclusions about cause and effect can be drawn from natural experiments," the Nobel committee said in a statement. (Photos by Handout / various sources / AFP) / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO /Stanford Graduate School of Business, MIT Department of Economics, University of California Berkeley/ HO, Andrew BRODHEAD" - NO MARKETING - NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS /

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(211011) -- STOCKHOLM, Oct. 11, 2021 (Xinhua) -- Portraits of the 2021 Nobel laureates in Economics are seen at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in Stockholm, Sweden, on Oct. 11, 2021. Three economists have won the 2021 Nobel Prize in Economics, or officially the Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel. The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences said on Monday it has decided to award the prize with one half to David Card, "for his empirical contributions to labor economics," and the other half jointly to Joshua D. Angrist and Guido W. Imbens, "for their methodological contributions to the analysis of causal relationships." (Photo by Wei Xuechao/Xinhua) Xinhua News Agency / eyevine

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Rappler CEO and Executive Editor Maria Ressa reacts during an interview at a restaurant in Taguig city, Philippines on Saturday, Oct. 9, 2021. The Nobel Peace Prize was awarded to journalists Maria Ressa of the Philippines and Dmitry Muratov of Russia for their fight for freedom of expression. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila), APTOPIX

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Rappler CEO and Executive Editor Maria Ressa reacts during an interview at a restaurant in Taguig city, Philippines on Saturday, Oct. 9, 2021. The Nobel Peace Prize was awarded to journalists Maria Ressa of the Philippines and Dmitry Muratov of Russia for their fight for freedom of expression. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila)

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Rappler CEO and Executive Editor Maria Ressa reacts during an interview at a restaurant in Taguig city, Philippines on Saturday, Oct. 9, 2021. The Nobel Peace Prize was awarded to journalists Maria Ressa of the Philippines and Dmitry Muratov of Russia for their fight for freedom of expression. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila)

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Rappler CEO and Executive Editor Maria Ressa gestures during an interview at a restaurant in Taguig city, Philippines on Saturday, Oct. 9, 2021. The Nobel Peace Prize was awarded to journalists Maria Ressa of the Philippines and Dmitry Muratov of Russia for their fight for freedom of expression. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila)

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Rappler CEO and Executive Editor Maria Ressa poses at a restaurant in Taguig city, Philippines on Saturday, Oct. 9, 2021. The Nobel Peace Prize was awarded to journalists Maria Ressa of the Philippines and Dmitry Muratov of Russia for their fight for freedom of expression. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila)

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Rappler CEO and Executive Editor Maria Ressa smiles at a restaurant in Taguig city, Philippines on Saturday, Oct. 9, 2021. The Nobel Peace Prize was awarded to journalists Maria Ressa of the Philippines and Dmitry Muratov of Russia for their fight for freedom of expression. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila)

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Rappler CEO and Executive Editor Maria Ressa smiles at a restaurant in Taguig city, Philippines on Saturday, Oct. 9, 2021. The Nobel Peace Prize was awarded to journalists Maria Ressa of the Philippines and Dmitry Muratov of Russia for their fight for freedom of expression. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila)

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Rappler CEO and Executive Editor Maria Ressa gestures during an interview at a restaurant in Taguig city, Philippines on Saturday, Oct. 9, 2021. The Nobel Peace Prize was awarded to journalists Maria Ressa of the Philippines and Dmitry Muratov of Russia for their fight for freedom of expression. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila)

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Rappler CEO and Executive Editor Maria Ressa gestures while talking at a restaurant in Taguig city, Philippines on Saturday, Oct. 9, 2021. The Nobel Peace Prize was awarded to journalists Maria Ressa of the Philippines and Dmitry Muratov of Russia for their fight for freedom of expression. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila)

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Rappler CEO and Executive Editor Maria Ressa removes her masks as she prepares for an interview at a restaurant in Taguig city, Philippines on Saturday, Oct. 9, 2021. The Nobel Peace Prize was awarded to journalists Maria Ressa of the Philippines and Dmitry Muratov of Russia for their fight for freedom of expression. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila)

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Rappler CEO and Executive Editor Maria Ressa gestures during an interview at a restaurant in Taguig city, Philippines on Saturday, Oct. 9, 2021. The Nobel Peace Prize was awarded to journalists Maria Ressa of the Philippines and Dmitry Muratov of Russia for their fight for freedom of expression. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila)

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Rappler CEO and Executive Editor Maria Ressa reacts during an interview at a restaurant in Taguig city, Philippines on Saturday, Oct. 9, 2021. The Nobel Peace Prize was awarded to journalists Maria Ressa of the Philippines and Dmitry Muratov of Russia for their fight for freedom of expression. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila)

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TOPSHOT - Russia's top independent newspaper Novaya Gazeta chief editor and the 2021 Nobel Peace Prize winner Dmitry Muratov meets with reporters outside the newspaper's office in Moscow on October 8, 2021. (Photo by NATALIA KOLESNIKOVA / AFP)

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Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida celebrates Syukuro Manabe by online at prime minister's office in Tokyo on October 8, 2021. Syukuro Manabe, Princeton University Meteorologist Professor, won the 2021 Nobel Prize in physics. 90-year-old Manabe, Japanese-born American, pioneered the use of computers to simulate global climate change and natural climate variations. Manabe was awarded the 2021 Nobel Prize in Physics jointly with Klaus Hasselmann and Giorgio Parisi for groundbreaking contributions to the physical modeling of earth's climate, quantifying variability and reliably predicting global warming. ( The Yomiuri Shimbun via AP Images )

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Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida celebrates Syukuro Manabe by online at prime minister's office in Tokyo on October 8, 2021. Syukuro Manabe, Princeton University Meteorologist Professor, won the 2021 Nobel Prize in physics. 90-year-old Manabe, Japanese-born American, pioneered the use of computers to simulate global climate change and natural climate variations. Manabe was awarded the 2021 Nobel Prize in Physics jointly with Klaus Hasselmann and Giorgio Parisi for groundbreaking contributions to the physical modeling of earth's climate, quantifying variability and reliably predicting global warming. ( The Yomiuri Shimbun via AP Images )

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Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida celebrates Syukuro Manabe by online at prime minister's office in Tokyo on October 8, 2021. Syukuro Manabe, Princeton University Meteorologist Professor, won the 2021 Nobel Prize in physics. 90-year-old Manabe, Japanese-born American, pioneered the use of computers to simulate global climate change and natural climate variations. Manabe was awarded the 2021 Nobel Prize in Physics jointly with Klaus Hasselmann and Giorgio Parisi for groundbreaking contributions to the physical modeling of earth's climate, quantifying variability and reliably predicting global warming. ( The Yomiuri Shimbun via AP Images )

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Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida celebrates Syukuro Manabe by online at prime minister's office in Tokyo on October 8, 2021. Syukuro Manabe, Princeton University Meteorologist Professor, won the 2021 Nobel Prize in physics. 90-year-old Manabe, Japanese-born American, pioneered the use of computers to simulate global climate change and natural climate variations. Manabe was awarded the 2021 Nobel Prize in Physics jointly with Klaus Hasselmann and Giorgio Parisi for groundbreaking contributions to the physical modeling of earth's climate, quantifying variability and reliably predicting global warming. ( The Yomiuri Shimbun via AP Images )

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Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida celebrates Syukuro Manabe by online at prime minister's office in Tokyo on October 8, 2021. Syukuro Manabe, Princeton University Meteorologist Professor, won the 2021 Nobel Prize in physics. 90-year-old Manabe, Japanese-born American, pioneered the use of computers to simulate global climate change and natural climate variations. Manabe was awarded the 2021 Nobel Prize in Physics jointly with Klaus Hasselmann and Giorgio Parisi for groundbreaking contributions to the physical modeling of earth's climate, quantifying variability and reliably predicting global warming. ( The Yomiuri Shimbun via AP Images )

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Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida celebrates Syukuro Manabe by online at prime minister's office in Tokyo on October 8, 2021. Syukuro Manabe, Princeton University Meteorologist Professor, won the 2021 Nobel Prize in physics. 90-year-old Manabe, Japanese-born American, pioneered the use of computers to simulate global climate change and natural climate variations. Manabe was awarded the 2021 Nobel Prize in Physics jointly with Klaus Hasselmann and Giorgio Parisi for groundbreaking contributions to the physical modeling of earth's climate, quantifying variability and reliably predicting global warming. ( The Yomiuri Shimbun via AP Images )

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Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida celebrates Syukuro Manabe by online at prime minister's office in Tokyo on October 8, 2021. Syukuro Manabe, Princeton University Meteorologist Professor, won the 2021 Nobel Prize in physics. 90-year-old Manabe, Japanese-born American, pioneered the use of computers to simulate global climate change and natural climate variations. Manabe was awarded the 2021 Nobel Prize in Physics jointly with Klaus Hasselmann and Giorgio Parisi for groundbreaking contributions to the physical modeling of earth's climate, quantifying variability and reliably predicting global warming. ( The Yomiuri Shimbun via AP Images )

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Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida celebrates Syukuro Manabe by online at prime minister's office in Tokyo on October 8, 2021. Syukuro Manabe, Princeton University Meteorologist Professor, won the 2021 Nobel Prize in physics. 90-year-old Manabe, Japanese-born American, pioneered the use of computers to simulate global climate change and natural climate variations. Manabe was awarded the 2021 Nobel Prize in Physics jointly with Klaus Hasselmann and Giorgio Parisi for groundbreaking contributions to the physical modeling of earth's climate, quantifying variability and reliably predicting global warming. ( The Yomiuri Shimbun via AP Images )

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Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida celebrates Syukuro Manabe by online at prime minister's office in Tokyo on October 8, 2021. Syukuro Manabe, Princeton University Meteorologist Professor, won the 2021 Nobel Prize in physics. 90-year-old Manabe, Japanese-born American, pioneered the use of computers to simulate global climate change and natural climate variations. Manabe was awarded the 2021 Nobel Prize in Physics jointly with Klaus Hasselmann and Giorgio Parisi for groundbreaking contributions to the physical modeling of earth's climate, quantifying variability and reliably predicting global warming. ( The Yomiuri Shimbun via AP Images )

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Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida celebrates Syukuro Manabe by online at prime minister's office in Tokyo on October 8, 2021. Syukuro Manabe, Princeton University Meteorologist Professor, won the 2021 Nobel Prize in physics. 90-year-old Manabe, Japanese-born American, pioneered the use of computers to simulate global climate change and natural climate variations. Manabe was awarded the 2021 Nobel Prize in Physics jointly with Klaus Hasselmann and Giorgio Parisi for groundbreaking contributions to the physical modeling of earth's climate, quantifying variability and reliably predicting global warming. ( The Yomiuri Shimbun via AP Images )

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Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida celebrates Syukuro Manabe by online at prime minister's office in Tokyo on October 8, 2021. Syukuro Manabe, Princeton University Meteorologist Professor, won the 2021 Nobel Prize in physics. 90-year-old Manabe, Japanese-born American, pioneered the use of computers to simulate global climate change and natural climate variations. Manabe was awarded the 2021 Nobel Prize in Physics jointly with Klaus Hasselmann and Giorgio Parisi for groundbreaking contributions to the physical modeling of earth's climate, quantifying variability and reliably predicting global warming. ( The Yomiuri Shimbun via AP Images )

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The chairman of the Norwegian Nobel Peace Prize Committee, Berit Reiss-Andersen, announces the laureate of the 2021 Nobel Peace Prize to journalists Maria Ressa of the Philippines and Dmitry Muratov of Russia, in the Nobel Institute, in Oslo, Friday, Oct. 8, 2021. They were cited for their fight for freedom of expression. (Heiko Junge/NTB scanpix via AP)

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The chairman of the Norwegian Nobel Peace Prize Committee, Berit Reiss-Andersen, center, announces the laureate of the 2021 Nobel Peace Prize to journalists Maria Ressa of the Philippines and Dmitry Muratov of Russia, in the Nobel Institute, in Oslo, Friday, Oct. 8, 2021. They were cited for their fight for freedom of expression. (Heiko Junge/NTB scanpix via AP)

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The chairman of the Norwegian Nobel Peace Prize Committee, Berit Reiss-Andersen, announces the laureate of the 2021 Nobel Peace Prize to journalists Maria Ressa of the Philippines and Dmitry Muratov of Russia, in the Nobel Institute, in Oslo, Friday, Oct. 8, 2021. They were cited for their fight for freedom of expression. (Heiko Junge/NTB scanpix via AP)

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The chairman of the Norwegian Nobel Peace Prize Committee, Berit Reiss-Andersen, center, announces the laureate of the 2021 Nobel Peace Prize to journalists Maria Ressa of the Philippines and Dmitry Muratov of Russia, in the Nobel Institute, in Oslo, Friday, Oct. 8, 2021. They were cited for their fight for freedom of expression. (Heiko Junge/NTB scanpix via AP)

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The chairman of the Norwegian Nobel Peace Prize Committee, Berit Reiss-Andersen, announces the laureate of the 2021 Nobel Peace Prize to journalists Maria Ressa of the Philippines and Dmitry Muratov of Russia, in the Nobel Institute, in Oslo, Friday, Oct. 8, 2021. They were cited for their fight for freedom of expression. (Heiko Junge/NTB scanpix via AP)

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The chairman of the Norwegian Nobel Peace Prize Committee, Berit Reiss-Andersen, holds up a phone showing pictures of the 2021 Nobel Peace Prize winners journalists Maria Ressa of the Philippines, left, and Dmitry Muratov of Russia, after making the announcement at the Nobel Institute, in Oslo, Friday, Oct. 8, 2021. They were cited for their fight for freedom of expression. (Heiko Junge/NTB scanpix via AP)

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The chairman of the Norwegian Nobel Peace Prize Committee, Berit Reiss-Andersen, holds up a phone showing pictures of the 2021 Nobel Peace Prize winners journalists Maria Ressa of the Philippines, left, and Dmitry Muratov of Russia, after making the announcement at the Nobel Institute, in Oslo, Friday, Oct. 8, 2021. They were cited for their fight for freedom of expression. (Heiko Junge/NTB scanpix via AP)

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The chairman of the Norwegian Nobel Peace Prize Committee, Berit Reiss-Andersen, holds up a phone showing pictures of the 2021 Nobel Peace Prize winners journalists Maria Ressa of the Philippines, left, and Dmitry Muratov of Russia, after making the announcement at the Nobel Institute, in Oslo, Friday, Oct. 8, 2021. They were cited for their fight for freedom of expression. (Heiko Junge/NTB scanpix via AP)

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Christophe Deloire, head Reporters without Borders, known by its French acronym RSF, delivers his reaction during an interview in front of a portrait of Maria Ressa of the Philippines after the announcement of the Nobel Peace Prize, in Paris, Friday, Oct. 8, 2021. The Nobel Peace Prize has been awarded to journalists Maria Ressa of the Philippines and Dmitry Muratov of Russia. They were citing for their fight for freedom of expression. (AP Photo/Francois Mori)

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A reporter takes a picture of a board with a portrait of Maria Ressa of the Philippines after the announcement of the Nobel Peace Prize, in the headquarters of Reporters without Borders, known by its French acronym RSF, in Paris, Friday, Oct. 8, 2021. The Nobel Peace Prize has been awarded to journalists Maria Ressa of the Philippines and Dmitry Muratov of Russia. They were citing for their fight for freedom of expression. (AP Photo/Francois Mori)

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A dove, symbol of peace, is released from the Nobel Peace Center on the occasion of the announcement of the 2021 Nobel Peace Prize, in Oslo, Friday, Oct. 8, 2021. The Norwegian Nobel Peace Prize Committee awarded the Nobel Peace Prize to journalists Maria Ressa of the Philippines and Dmitry Muratov of Russia for their fight for freedom of expression. (Heiko Junge/NTB scanpix via AP)

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Christophe Deloire, head Reporters without Borders, known by its French acronym RSF, delivers his reaction during an interview in front of a portrait of Maria Ressa of the Philippines after the announcement of the Nobel Peace Prize, in Paris, Friday, Oct. 8, 2021. The Nobel Peace Prize has been awarded to journalists Maria Ressa of the Philippines and Dmitry Muratov of Russia. They were citing for their fight for freedom of expression. (AP Photo/Francois Mori)

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A reporter takes a picture of a board with a portrait of Maria Ressa of the Philippines after the announcement of the Nobel Peace Prize, in the headquarters of Reporters without Borders, known by its French acronym RSF, in Paris, Friday, Oct. 8, 2021. The Nobel Peace Prize has been awarded to journalists Ressa of the Philippines and Dmitry Muratov of Russia. (AP Photo/Francois Mori)

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Physics Nobel Laureate, Italian theoretical physicist Giorgio Parisi poses for portraits in Rome, Friday, Oct. 8, 2021. The 2021 Nobel Prize for physics has been awarded to scientists from Japan, Germany and Italy. Parisi was awarded half of the prize for "the discovery of the interplay of disorder and fluctuations in physical systems from atomic to planetary scales." (AP Photo/Domenico Stinellis)

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Physics Nobel Laureate, Italian theoretical physicist Giorgio Parisi poses for portraits in Rome, Friday, Oct. 8, 2021. The 2021 Nobel Prize for physics has been awarded to scientists from Japan, Germany and Italy. Parisi was awarded half of the prize for "the discovery of the interplay of disorder and fluctuations in physical systems from atomic to planetary scales." (AP Photo/Domenico Stinellis)

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EN_01496708_1231

Physics Nobel Laureate, Italian theoretical physicist Giorgio Parisi poses for portraits in Rome, Friday, Oct. 8, 2021. The 2021 Nobel Prize for physics has been awarded to scientists from Japan, Germany and Italy. Parisi was awarded half of the prize for "the discovery of the interplay of disorder and fluctuations in physical systems from atomic to planetary scales." (AP Photo/Domenico Stinellis)

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Physics Nobel Laureate, Italian theoretical physicist Giorgio Parisi poses for portraits in Rome, Friday, Oct. 8, 2021. The 2021 Nobel Prize for physics has been awarded to scientists from Japan, Germany and Italy. Parisi was awarded half of the prize for "the discovery of the interplay of disorder and fluctuations in physical systems from atomic to planetary scales." (AP Photo/Domenico Stinellis)

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Photo taken in March 2016 shows Dmitry Muratov, the editor-in-chief of the Russian independent newspaper Novaya Gazeta, giving an interview in Moscow. Muratov and Filipino journalist Maria Ressa won the 2021 Nobel Peace Prize for their efforts to safeguard freedom of expression. (Kyodo via AP Images) ==Kyodo

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Photo taken in March 2016 shows Dmitry Muratov, the editor-in-chief of the Russian independent newspaper Novaya Gazeta, giving an interview in Moscow. Muratov and Filipino journalist Maria Ressa won the 2021 Nobel Peace Prize for their efforts to safeguard freedom of expression. (Kyodo via AP Images) ==Kyodo

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Tanzanian writer Abdulrazak Gurnah poses ahead of a press conference in London, Friday, Oct. 8, 2021. Gurnah was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature on Thursday. The Swedish Academy said the award was in recognition of his "uncompromising and compassionate penetration of the effects of colonialism." (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth)

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Tanzanian writer Abdulrazak Gurnah poses ahead of a press conference in London, Friday, Oct. 8, 2021. Gurnah was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature on Thursday. The Swedish Academy said the award was in recognition of his "uncompromising and compassionate penetration of the effects of colonialism." (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth)

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Tanzanian writer Abdulrazak Gurnah poses ahead of a press conference in London, Friday, Oct. 8, 2021. Gurnah was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature on Thursday. The Swedish Academy said the award was in recognition of his "uncompromising and compassionate penetration of the effects of colonialism." (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth)

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Tanzanian writer Abdulrazak Gurnah poses ahead of a press conference in London, Friday, Oct. 8, 2021. Gurnah was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature on Thursday. The Swedish Academy said the award was in recognition of his "uncompromising and compassionate penetration of the effects of colonialism." (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth)

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Tanzanian writer Abdulrazak Gurnah smiles ahead of a press conference in London, Friday, Oct. 8, 2021. Gurnah was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature on Thursday. The Swedish Academy said the award was in recognition of his "uncompromising and compassionate penetration of the effects of colonialism." (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth)

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Tanzanian writer Abdulrazak Gurnah smiles ahead of a press conference in London, Friday, Oct. 8, 2021. Gurnah was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature on Thursday. The Swedish Academy said the award was in recognition of his "uncompromising and compassionate penetration of the effects of colonialism." (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth)

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Tanzanian writer Abdulrazak Gurnah poses ahead of a press conference in London, Friday, Oct. 8, 2021. Gurnah was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature on Thursday. The Swedish Academy said the award was in recognition of his "uncompromising and compassionate penetration of the effects of colonialism." (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth)

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Tanzanian writer Abdulrazak Gurnah smiles ahead of a press conference in London, Friday, Oct. 8, 2021. Gurnah was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature on Thursday. The Swedish Academy said the award was in recognition of his "uncompromising and compassionate penetration of the effects of colonialism." (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth)

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Novaya Gazeta editor Dmitry Muratov talks to media at the Novaya Gazeta newspaper, in Moscow, Russia, Friday, Oct. 8, 2021. The 2021 Nobel Peace Prize has been awarded to journalists Maria Ressa of the Philippines and Dmitry Muratov of Russia. The Norwegian Nobel Committee cited their fight for freedom of expression, stressing that it is vital in promoting peace. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko)

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Novaya Gazeta editor Dmitry Muratov greets reporters at the Novaya Gazeta newspaper, in Moscow, Russia, Friday, Oct. 8, 2021. The 2021 Nobel Peace Prize has been awarded to journalists Maria Ressa of the Philippines and Dmitry Muratov of Russia. The Norwegian Nobel Committee cited their fight for freedom of expression, stressing that it is vital in promoting peace. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko)

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Novaya Gazeta editor Dmitry Muratov talks to media at the Novaya Gazeta newspaper, in Moscow, Russia, Friday, Oct. 8, 2021. The 2021 Nobel Peace Prize has been awarded to journalists Maria Ressa of the Philippines and Dmitry Muratov of Russia. The Norwegian Nobel Committee cited their fight for freedom of expression, stressing that it is vital in promoting peace. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko)

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Novaya Gazeta editor Dmitry Muratov greets reporters at the Novaya Gazeta newspaper, in Moscow, Russia, Friday, Oct. 8, 2021. The 2021 Nobel Peace Prize has been awarded to journalists Maria Ressa of the Philippines and Dmitry Muratov of Russia. The Norwegian Nobel Committee cited their fight for freedom of expression, stressing that it is vital in promoting peace. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko)

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Novaya Gazeta editor Dmitry Muratov talks to media at the Novaya Gazeta newspaper, in Moscow, Russia, Friday, Oct. 8, 2021. The 2021 Nobel Peace Prize has been awarded to journalists Maria Ressa of the Philippines and Dmitry Muratov of Russia. The Norwegian Nobel Committee cited their fight for freedom of expression, stressing that it is vital in promoting peace. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko)

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Novaya Gazeta editor Dmitry Muratov greets reporters at the Novaya Gazeta newspaper, in Moscow, Russia, Friday, Oct. 8, 2021. The 2021 Nobel Peace Prize has been awarded to journalists Maria Ressa of the Philippines and Dmitry Muratov of Russia. The Norwegian Nobel Committee cited their fight for freedom of expression, stressing that it is vital in promoting peace. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko) Dmitry Muratov

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Novaya Gazeta editor Dmitry Muratov talks to media at the Novaya Gazeta newspaper, in Moscow, Russia, Friday, Oct. 8, 2021. The 2021 Nobel Peace Prize has been awarded to journalists Maria Ressa of the Philippines and Dmitry Muratov of Russia. The Norwegian Nobel Committee cited their fight for freedom of expression, stressing that it is vital in promoting peace. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko)

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Novaya Gazeta editor Dmitry Muratov talks to media at the Novaya Gazeta newspaper, in Moscow, Russia, Friday, Oct. 8, 2021. The 2021 Nobel Peace Prize has been awarded to journalists Maria Ressa of the Philippines and Dmitry Muratov of Russia. The Norwegian Nobel Committee cited their fight for freedom of expression, stressing that it is vital in promoting peace. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko)

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Novaya Gazeta editor Dmitry Muratov talks to media at the Novaya Gazeta newspaper, in Moscow, Russia, Friday, Oct. 8, 2021. The 2021 Nobel Peace Prize has been awarded to journalists Maria Ressa of the Philippines and Dmitry Muratov of Russia. The Norwegian Nobel Committee cited their fight for freedom of expression, stressing that it is vital in promoting peace. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko)

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Colleagues pour champaign on Novaya Gazeta editor Dmitry Muratov at the Novaya Gazeta newspaper, in Moscow, Russia, Friday, Oct. 8, 2021. The 2021 Nobel Peace Prize has been awarded to journalists Maria Ressa of the Philippines and Dmitry Muratov of Russia. The Norwegian Nobel Committee cited their fight for freedom of expression, stressing that it is vital in promoting peace. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko)

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Colleagues congratulate Novaya Gazeta editor Dmitry Muratov at the Novaya Gazeta newspaper, in Moscow, Russia, Friday, Oct. 8, 2021. The 2021 Nobel Peace Prize has been awarded to journalists Maria Ressa of the Philippines and Dmitry Muratov of Russia. The Norwegian Nobel Committee cited their fight for freedom of expression, stressing that it is vital in promoting peace. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko)

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Novaya Gazeta editor Dmitry Muratov raises glasses with his colleagues at the Novaya Gazeta newspaper, in Moscow, Russia, Friday, Oct. 8, 2021. The 2021 Nobel Peace Prize has been awarded to journalists Maria Ressa of the Philippines and Dmitry Muratov of Russia. The Norwegian Nobel Committee cited their fight for freedom of expression, stressing that it is vital in promoting peace. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko)

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Novaya Gazeta editor Dmitry Muratov talks to media at the Novaya Gazeta newspaper, in Moscow, Russia, Friday, Oct. 8, 2021. The 2021 Nobel Peace Prize has been awarded to journalists Maria Ressa of the Philippines and Dmitry Muratov of Russia. The Norwegian Nobel Committee cited their fight for freedom of expression, stressing that it is vital in promoting peace. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko)

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Colleagues congratulate Novaya Gazeta editor Dmitry Muratov at the Novaya Gazeta newspaper, in Moscow, Russia, Friday, Oct. 8, 2021. The 2021 Nobel Peace Prize has been awarded to journalists Maria Ressa of the Philippines and Dmitry Muratov of Russia. The Norwegian Nobel Committee cited their fight for freedom of expression, stressing that it is vital in promoting peace. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko)

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Colleagues congratulate Novaya Gazeta editor Dmitry Muratov at the Novaya Gazeta newspaper, in Moscow, Russia, Friday, Oct. 8, 2021. The 2021 Nobel Peace Prize has been awarded to journalists Maria Ressa of the Philippines and Dmitry Muratov of Russia. The Norwegian Nobel Committee cited their fight for freedom of expression, stressing that it is vital in promoting peace. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko)

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Novaya Gazeta editor Dmitry Muratov talks to a photographer at the Novaya Gazeta newspaper, in Moscow, Russia, Friday, Oct. 8, 2021. The 2021 Nobel Peace Prize has been awarded to journalists Maria Ressa of the Philippines and Dmitry Muratov of Russia. The Norwegian Nobel Committee cited their fight for freedom of expression, stressing that it is vital in promoting peace. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko)

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Colleagues congratulate Novaya Gazeta editor Dmitry Muratov at the Novaya Gazeta newspaper, in Moscow, Russia, Friday, Oct. 8, 2021. The 2021 Nobel Peace Prize has been awarded to journalists Maria Ressa of the Philippines and Dmitry Muratov of Russia. The Norwegian Nobel Committee cited their fight for freedom of expression, stressing that it is vital in promoting peace. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko)

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Novaya Gazeta editor Dmitry Muratov talks to media at the Novaya Gazeta newspaper, in Moscow, Russia, Friday, Oct. 8, 2021. The 2021 Nobel Peace Prize has been awarded to journalists Maria Ressa of the Philippines and Dmitry Muratov of Russia. The Norwegian Nobel Committee cited their fight for freedom of expression, stressing that it is vital in promoting peace. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko)

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Novaya Gazeta editor Dmitry Muratov on air at the Ekho Moskvy (Echo of Moscow) radio station in Moscow, Russia, Friday, Oct. 8, 2021. The 2021 Nobel Peace Prize has been awarded to journalists Maria Ressa of the Philippines and Dmitry Muratov of Russia. The Norwegian Nobel Committee cited their fight for freedom of expression, stressing that it is vital in promoting peace. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko)

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Novaya Gazeta editor Dmitry Muratov, left, and journalist Yevgeni Buntman on air at the Ekho Moskvy (Echo of Moscow) radio station in Moscow, Russia, Friday, Oct. 8, 2021. The 2021 Nobel Peace Prize has been awarded to journalists Maria Ressa of the Philippines and Dmitry Muratov of Russia. The Norwegian Nobel Committee cited their fight for freedom of expression, stressing that it is vital in promoting peace. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko)

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Novaya Gazeta editor Dmitry Muratov gets ready for the Ekho Moskvy (Echo of Moscow) radio station live broadcast in Moscow, Russia, Friday, Oct. 8, 2021. The 2021 Nobel Peace Prize has been awarded to journalists Maria Ressa of the Philippines and Dmitry Muratov of Russia. The Norwegian Nobel Committee cited their fight for freedom of expression, stressing that it is vital in promoting peace. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko)

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Novaya Gazeta editor Dmitry Muratov talks during the Ekho Moskvy (Echo of Moscow) radio station live broadcast in Moscow, Russia, Friday, Oct. 8, 2021. The 2021 Nobel Peace Prize has been awarded to journalists Maria Ressa of the Philippines and Dmitry Muratov of Russia. The Norwegian Nobel Committee cited their fight for freedom of expression, stressing that it is vital in promoting peace. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko)

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Novaya Gazeta editor Dmitry Muratov, left, and journalist Yevgeni Buntman on air at the Ekho Moskvy (Echo of Moscow) radio station in Moscow, Russia, Friday, Oct. 8, 2021. The 2021 Nobel Peace Prize has been awarded to journalists Maria Ressa of the Philippines and Dmitry Muratov of Russia. The Norwegian Nobel Committee cited their fight for freedom of expression, stressing that it is vital in promoting peace. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko)

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Novaya Gazeta editor Dmitry Muratov, left, and journalist Yevgeni Buntman on air at the Ekho Moskvy (Echo of Moscow) radio station in Moscow, Russia, Friday, Oct. 8, 2021. The 2021 Nobel Peace Prize has been awarded to journalists Maria Ressa of the Philippines and Dmitry Muratov of Russia. The Norwegian Nobel Committee cited their fight for freedom of expression, stressing that it is vital in promoting peace. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko)

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Novaya Gazeta editor Dmitry Muratov talks during the Ekho Moskvy (Echo of Moscow) radio station live broadcast in Moscow, Russia, Friday, Oct. 8, 2021. The 2021 Nobel Peace Prize has been awarded to journalists Maria Ressa of the Philippines and Dmitry Muratov of Russia. The Norwegian Nobel Committee cited their fight for freedom of expression, stressing that it is vital in promoting peace. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko)

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Novaya Gazeta editor Dmitry Muratov walk at the Ekho Moskvy (Echo of Moscow) radio station in Moscow, Russia, Friday, Oct. 8, 2021. The 2021 Nobel Peace Prize has been awarded to journalists Maria Ressa of the Philippines and Dmitry Muratov of Russia. The Norwegian Nobel Committee cited their fight for freedom of expression, stressing that it is vital in promoting peace. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko)

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Novaya Gazeta editor Dmitry Muratov talks prior to the Ekho Moskvy (Echo of Moscow) radio station live broadcast in Moscow, Russia, Friday, Oct. 8, 2021. The 2021 Nobel Peace Prize has been awarded to journalists Maria Ressa of the Philippines and Dmitry Muratov of Russia. The Norwegian Nobel Committee cited their fight for freedom of expression, stressing that it is vital in promoting peace. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko)

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Novaya Gazeta editor Dmitry Muratov talks prior to the Ekho Moskvy (Echo of Moscow) radio station live broadcast in Moscow, Russia, Friday, Oct. 8, 2021. The 2021 Nobel Peace Prize has been awarded to journalists Maria Ressa of the Philippines and Dmitry Muratov of Russia. The Norwegian Nobel Committee cited their fight for freedom of expression, stressing that it is vital in promoting peace. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko)

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Novaya Gazeta editor Dmitry Muratov talks to a reporter at the Ekho Moskvy (Echo of Moscow) radio station live broadcast in Moscow, Russia, Friday, Oct. 8, 2021. The 2021 Nobel Peace Prize has been awarded to journalists Maria Ressa of the Philippines and Dmitry Muratov of Russia. The Norwegian Nobel Committee cited their fight for freedom of expression, stressing that it is vital in promoting peace. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko)

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Novaya Gazeta editor Dmitry Muratov gestures as he greets reporters at the Novaya Gazeta newspaper, in Moscow, Russia, Friday, Oct. 8, 2021. The 2021 Nobel Peace Prize has been awarded to journalists Maria Ressa of the Philippines and Dmitry Muratov of Russia. The Norwegian Nobel Committee cited their fight for freedom of expression, stressing that it is vital in promoting peace. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko)

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Colleagues pour champagne for Novaya Gazeta editor Dmitry Muratov at the Novaya Gazeta newspaper, in Moscow, Russia, Friday, Oct. 8, 2021. The 2021 Nobel Peace Prize has been awarded to journalists Maria Ressa of the Philippines and Dmitry Muratov of Russia. The Norwegian Nobel Committee cited their fight for freedom of expression, stressing that it is vital in promoting peace. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko)

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Colleagues open champagne toward Novaya Gazeta editor Dmitry Muratov at the Novaya Gazeta newspaper, in Moscow, Russia, Friday, Oct. 8, 2021. The 2021 Nobel Peace Prize has been awarded to journalists Maria Ressa of the Philippines and Dmitry Muratov of Russia. The Norwegian Nobel Committee cited their fight for freedom of expression, stressing that it is vital in promoting peace. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko)

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Colleagues open champagne over Novaya Gazeta editor Dmitry Muratov at the Novaya Gazeta newspaper, in Moscow, Russia, Friday, Oct. 8, 2021. The 2021 Nobel Peace Prize has been awarded to journalists Maria Ressa of the Philippines and Dmitry Muratov of Russia. The Norwegian Nobel Committee cited their fight for freedom of expression, stressing that it is vital in promoting peace. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko)

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Colleagues open champagne toward Novaya Gazeta editor Dmitry Muratov at the Novaya Gazeta newspaper, in Moscow, Russia, Friday, Oct. 8, 2021. The 2021 Nobel Peace Prize has been awarded to journalists Maria Ressa of the Philippines and Dmitry Muratov of Russia. The Norwegian Nobel Committee cited their fight for freedom of expression, stressing that it is vital in promoting peace. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko)

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Colleagues toast Novaya Gazeta editor Dmitry Muratov, left, at the Novaya Gazeta newspaper, in Moscow, Russia, Friday, Oct. 8, 2021. The 2021 Nobel Peace Prize has been awarded to journalists Maria Ressa of the Philippines and Dmitry Muratov of Russia. The Norwegian Nobel Committee cited their fight for freedom of expression, stressing that it is vital in promoting peace. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko)

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Norwegian Nobel Committee Chairwoman Berit Reiss-Andersen gives an interview in Oslo on Oct. 8, 2021. (Kyodo via AP Images) ==Kyodo

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Norwegian Nobel Committee Chairwoman Berit Reiss-Andersen gives an interview in Oslo on Oct. 8, 2021. (Kyodo via AP Images) ==Kyodo

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Berit Reiss-Andersen, chair of the Nobel Peace Prize Committee, gives a press conference to announce the winners of the 2021 Nobel Peace Prize at the Norwegian Nobel Institute in Oslo, on October 8, 2021. - The Nobel Peace Prize was awarded to journalists Maria Ressa of the Philippines and Dmitry Muratov of Russia for their fight for freedom of expression in their countries. The pair were honoured "for their efforts to safeguard freedom of expression, which is a precondition for democracy and lasting peace," the chairwoman of the Norwegian Nobel Committee, Berit Reiss-Andersen, said. (Photo by Heiko Junge / NTB / AFP) / Norway OUT

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Berit Reiss-Andersen, chair of the Nobel Peace Prize Committee, speaks during a press conference to announce the winners of the 2021 Nobel Peace Prize at the Norwegian Nobel Institute in Oslo, on October 8, 2021. - The Nobel Peace Prize was awarded to journalists Maria Ressa of the Philippines and Dmitry Muratov of Russia for their fight for freedom of expression in their countries. The pair were honoured "for their efforts to safeguard freedom of expression, which is a precondition for democracy and lasting peace," the chairwoman of the Norwegian Nobel Committee, Berit Reiss-Andersen, said. (Photo by Heiko Junge / NTB / AFP) / Norway OUT

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Berit Reiss-Andersen, chair of the Nobel Peace Prize Committee, speaks during a press conference to announce the winner of the 2021 Nobel Peace Prize at the Norwegian Nobel Institute in Oslo, on October 8, 2021. - The Nobel Peace Prize was awarded to journalists Maria Ressa of the Philippines and Dmitry Muratov of Russia for their fight for freedom of expression in their countries. The pair were honoured "for their efforts to safeguard freedom of expression, which is a precondition for democracy and lasting peace," the chairwoman of the Norwegian Nobel Committee, Berit Reiss-Andersen, said. (Photo by Heiko Junge / NTB / AFP) / Norway OUT

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Berit Reiss-Andersen, chair of the Nobel Peace Prize Committee, speaks during a press conference to announce the winner of the 2021 Nobel Peace Prize at the Norwegian Nobel Institute in Oslo, on October 8, 2021. - The Nobel Peace Prize was awarded to journalists Maria Ressa of the Philippines and Dmitry Muratov of Russia for their fight for freedom of expression in their countries. The pair were honoured "for their efforts to safeguard freedom of expression, which is a precondition for democracy and lasting peace," the chairwoman of the Norwegian Nobel Committee, Berit Reiss-Andersen, said. (Photo by Heiko Junge / NTB / AFP) / Norway OUT

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(COMBO) This file combination of pictures created on October 08, 2021, shows Maria Ressa (L), co-founder and CEO of the Philippines-based news website Rappler, speaking at the Human Rights Press Awards at the Foreign Correspondents Club of Hong Kong on on May 16, 2019 and Dmitry Muratov, editor-in-Chief of Russia's main opposition newspaper Novaya Gazeta gestures as he speaks during a news conference in Moscow, on December 11, 2012. - The Nobel Peace Prize goes to journalists Maria Ressa (Philippines) and Russian Dmitry Muratov, the Nobel Peace Prize committee announced on October 8, 2021 in Oslo. (Photo by Isaac LAWRENCE and Yuri KADOBNOV / AFP)

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Berit Reiss-Andersen, chair of the Nobel Peace Prize Committee, speaks during a press conference to announce the winner of the 2021 Nobel Peace Prize at the Norwegian Nobel Institute in Oslo, on October 8, 2021. - The Nobel Peace Prize was awarded to journalists Maria Ressa of the Philippines and Dmitry Muratov of Russia for their fight for freedom of expression in their countries. The pair were honoured "for their efforts to safeguard freedom of expression, which is a precondition for democracy and lasting peace," the chairwoman of the Norwegian Nobel Committee, Berit Reiss-Andersen, said. (Photo by Heiko Junge / NTB / AFP) / Norway OUT

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Journalists gather outside the office of Russia's top independent newspaper Novaya Gazeta after its chief editor Dmitry Muratov won the Nobel Peace Prize for his efforts to protect freedom of expression, in Moscow on October 8, 2021. (Photo by Dimitar DILKOFF / AFP)

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Berit Reiss-Andersen, chair of the Nobel Peace Prize Committee, presents a mobile phone displaying a combination of pictures of journalists Maria Ressa and Dmitry Muratov following a press conference to announce the winners of the 2021 Nobel Peace Prize at the Norwegian Nobel Institute in Oslo, on October 8, 2021. - The 2021 Nobel Peace Prize was awarded to journalists Maria Ressa of the Philippines and Dmitry Muratov of Russia for their fight for freedom of expression in their countries. The pair were honoured "for their efforts to safeguard freedom of expression, which is a precondition for democracy and lasting peace," the chairwoman of the Norwegian Nobel Committee, Berit Reiss-Andersen, said. (Photo by Heiko Junge / NTB / AFP) / Norway OUT

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Berit Reiss-Andersen, chair of the Nobel Peace Prize Committee, presents a mobile phone displaying a combination of pictures of journalists Maria Ressa and Dmitry Muratov following a press conference to announce the winners of the 2021 Nobel Peace Prize at the Norwegian Nobel Institute in Oslo, on October 8, 2021. - The 2021 Nobel Peace Prize was awarded to journalists Maria Ressa of the Philippines and Dmitry Muratov of Russia for their fight for freedom of expression in their countries. The pair were honoured "for their efforts to safeguard freedom of expression, which is a precondition for democracy and lasting peace," the chairwoman of the Norwegian Nobel Committee, Berit Reiss-Andersen, said. (Photo by Heiko Junge / NTB / AFP) / Norway OUT

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Berit Reiss-Andersen, chair of the Nobel Peace Prize Committee, presents a mobile phone displaying a combination of pictures of journalists Maria Ressa and Dmitry Muratov following a press conference to announce the winners of the 2021 Nobel Peace Prize at the Norwegian Nobel Institute in Oslo, on October 8, 2021. - The 2021 Nobel Peace Prize was awarded to journalists Maria Ressa of the Philippines and Dmitry Muratov of Russia for their fight for freedom of expression in their countries. The pair were honoured "for their efforts to safeguard freedom of expression, which is a precondition for democracy and lasting peace," the chairwoman of the Norwegian Nobel Committee, Berit Reiss-Andersen, said. (Photo by Heiko Junge / NTB / AFP) / Norway OUT

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Journalists gather outside the office of Russia's top independent newspaper Novaya Gazeta after its chief editor Dmitry Muratov won the Nobel Peace Prize for his efforts to protect freedom of expression, in Moscow on October 8, 2021. (Photo by Dimitar DILKOFF / AFP)

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Journalists gather outside the office of Russia's top independent newspaper Novaya Gazeta after its chief editor Dmitry Muratov won the Nobel Peace Prize for his efforts to protect freedom of expression, in Moscow on October 8, 2021. (Photo by Dimitar DILKOFF / AFP)

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A peace dove flies past a relief of Alfred Nobel after it was released in front of the Nobel Peace Center in Oslo, Norway, on October 8, 2021. - The 2021 Nobel Peace Prize was awarded to journalists Maria Ressa of the Philippines and Dmitry Muratov of Russia for their fight for freedom of expression in their countries. The pair were honoured "for their efforts to safeguard freedom of expression, which is a precondition for democracy and lasting peace," the chairwoman of the Norwegian Nobel Committee, Berit Reiss-Andersen, said. (Photo by Ali Zare / NTB / AFP) / Norway OUT

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Children play at Poklonnaya Hill war memorial in Moscow on October 8, 2021. - Russia's top independent newspaper Novaya Gazeta editor-in-chief Dmitry Muratov won the Nobel Peace Prize for his efforts to protect freedom of expression. (Photo by Alexander NEMENOV / AFP)

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People walk at Poklonnaya Hill war memorial in front of Moscow's International Business Centre (Moskva City) skyline in Moscow on October 8, 2021. - Russia's top independent newspaper Novaya Gazeta editor-in-chief Dmitry Muratov won the Nobel Peace Prize for his efforts to protect freedom of expression. (Photo by Alexander NEMENOV / AFP)

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